Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for

  • Author: Margaret Carlisle Duncan x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Margaret Carlisle Duncan

Restricted access

Margaret Carlisle Duncan

In this paper I explain the scholarly role of stories and argue for their power and efficacy in creating a particular kind of truth. Drawing on philosopher Richard Rorty’s insights about the “narrative turn,” I describe the importance of stories in particular and the imagination in general as tools for increasing our sensitivity to the pain of others. Stories convey the suffering of those whom we might be tempted to dismiss as having nothing in common with us. Stories allow us to re-envision ourselves as the marginalized Other, and thereby offer us the possibility of moral behavior. The measure of truth in stories is not a standard of objectivity, but rather their power to evoke the vividness of experience. Throughout this discussion, I weave my own stories about stigmatized bodies to illustrate how one might use the narrative turn in sport sociology.

Restricted access

Margaret Carlisle Duncan

Sport media scholars have been increasingly interested in studying sport media texts for their meanings, particularly meanings that relate to gender and gender stereotypes. I argue that it is time to go beyond our present level of sport media analysis by identifying the formal structures that give rise to individual texts. Using the method of homology, I examine three dialectical formal structures or mechanisms of patriarchy: objectification, commodification, and voyeurism. I then select a particular text, the March 1992 Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue, to show how these mechanisms are manifested in the photographs and captions. Finally, I situate the three mechanisms in the historical and cultural contexts of the last decade and a half, where political events reveal the underlying formal structures of patriarchy.

Restricted access

Margaret Carlisle Duncan

Restricted access

Margaret Carlisle Duncan

Restricted access

Margaret Carlisle Duncan

Restricted access

Margaret Carlisle Duncan

This paper develops a theoretical framework for understanding how and what sports photographs mean. In particular, it identifies two categories of photographic features as conveyors of meanings. The first category is the content or discourse within the photograph, which includes physical appearances, poses and body positions, facial expressions, emotional displays, and camera angles. The second category is the context, which contributes to the discursive text of the photograph. The context includes the visual space in which the photograph appears, its caption, the surrounding written text, and the title and the substantive nature of the article in which the photograph appears. Using 1984 and 1988 Olympic Games photographs appearing in popular North American magazines, I show how these various features of photographs may enable patriarchal readings that emphasize sexual difference.

Restricted access

Margaret Carlisle Duncan and Barry Brummett

This study of spectator groups viewing televised professional football revealed that spectators, particularly women, acted upon sport texts to empower themselves. Radical empowerment for women occurred when female spectators subverted the premises of the televised football spectacle, using irony, sarcasm, and limited commitment to the game to refuse the preferred (patriarchal) readings of the text. Liberal empowerment occurred when women (and men) used mediation as a way of extending the self into the game. While men often availed themselves of mediation in this way, women did so less often, perhaps because liberal empowerment is ultimately disempowering to women.

Restricted access

Margaret Carlisle Duncan and Barry Brummett

Although scholars have increasingly turned their attention to sport spectatorship, few have examined the particular appeals of television sports spectatorship. This study explains the pleasures of televised sports viewing by building on the work of media theorists. In particular, it argues that three types of specular pleasure (fetishism, voyeurism, narcissism) are found in televised sports. Further, it identifies discursive, technological, and social dimensions of televised sport spectating as the sources of those visual pleasures. The voyeurism, fetishism, and narcissism of televised sport are illustrated with examples drawn from videotapes of the 1988 Winter Olympic Games.