Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Marie Alricsson x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Yvonne Kahlin, Suzanne Werner and Marie Alricsson

Background:

Physical activity and sport participation often decline during adolescence.

Aim:

To investigate if physical exercise during 6 months could lead to a positive behavior of physical activity, improve physical fitness and self-related health in physically inactive female high school students.

Methods:

A prospective cluster-randomized controlled intervention study included 104 physically inactive female high school students, 60 in an intervention group and 44 controls. At baseline there were no group differences regarding self-related health. The intervention group exercised at least once per week. A questionnaire and physical fitness tests were used for evaluation, at baseline and 6 months later.

Results:

The intervention group improved their self-related health compared with the controls (P = .012). When divided into a regular (n = 27) and an irregular training group (n = 33) the regular training group improved their self-related health compared with the controls, while the irregular training group did not differ from the other groups. Maximal oxygen consumption was improved in the intervention group compared with the controls (P < .001). No group differences were found in muscle strength and endurance.

Conclusion:

Physical exercise at least once per week during 6 months improved physical fitness (maximal oxygen consumption) and self-related health in physically inactive female high school students.

Restricted access

Peter Pagels, Anders Raustorp, Trevor Archer, Ulf Lidman and Marie Alricsson

Background:

Health organizations suggest that adults ought to engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity daily physical activity. This study investigated the effects of a 30-minute single daily bout of brisk walking upon risk factors for coronary heart disease with blood lipid profile in particular.

Methods:

Thirty-three (25–45 y) adults, were randomly assigned into an exercise group (EG; n = 16, 9w) and a control group (CG; n = 17, 6w). The EG walked briskly 30 minutes daily during the 3-week test period. Compliance/adherence was maximal throughout the 3-week intervention due to stringent daily monitoring.

Results:

The EG showed a significant decrease in concentrations of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and total cholesterol (TC) during the intervention period. A significant inverse correlation between Δ energy expenditure/day and Δ LDL-C (r = –0.39, P < .05) and an improvement in weight and BMI in the EG was found. Average steps during 30 minutes brisk walking bout was 3669 steps/bout generating a mean energy expenditure of 191 kcal/ bout.

Conclusions:

The most unique findings were that daily single bouts of moderate-intensity physical activity for 30 minutes, during 3 weeks, induced favorable effects upon body weight, BMI, and blood concentration of LDL-C and TC in healthy adults.

Restricted access

Mattias Eckerman, Kjell Svensson, Gunnar Edman and Marie Alricsson

Context: The physical and mental demands of an elite football player are complex, which may explain why injuries are common in football. At elite level, muscle injuries of the lower-extremity are the most common among male football players, and the research hitherto is limited. Objective: To investigate whether personality traits affect the incidence of muscle injuries among male football players from the first league in Sweden. Design: Prospective cohort study. Participants: A male football team from the first league in Sweden was prospectively followed, in terms of muscle injuries of the lower-extremity during 8 seasons, between 2007 and 2015. Intervention: All muscle injuries included in this study were evaluated and diagnosed with ultrasonography. Players from the team filled out the Swedish Universities Scales of Personality questionnaire. Swedish Universities Scales of Personality questionnaire consists of 91 items and is divided into 13 categories. Main Outcome Measures: The raw values of each scale were linearly transformed to T scores, having a mean (SD) of 50 (10). All variables were summarized with standard descriptive statistics, such as frequency, mean, and SD. As data were of interval scale and no variable distribution was severely skewed, differences between noninjured players, rarely injured players, and frequently injured players were analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance with post hoc tests by Tukey honestly significant difference test. Results: No significant difference in personality traits were observed between noninjured players, rarely injured players, and frequently injured players regarding number of muscle injuries (P > .05). However, a trend (P = .07) was seen, where frequently injured players scored higher on stress susceptibility than rarely injured players. Conclusion: A player’s stress susceptibility should be taken into consideration by the player, coaches, and medical staff when assessing the risk of a muscle injury. Also, preventive measures available for these players may need to be considered.