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  • Author: Marie Boltz x
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Barbara Resnick, Elizabeth Galik, Marie Boltz, William Hawkes, Michelle Shardell, Denise Orwig and Jay Magaziner

The purpose of this study was to characterize physical activity (PA) based on survey and ActiGraphy data from older adults at 2 mo post–hip fracture and consider the factors that influence PA among these individuals. The sample included participants from a current Baltimore hip study, the BHS-7. Measurement of PA was based on the Yale PA Survey (YPAS) and 48 hr of ActiGraphy. The sample included the first 200 individuals enrolled in the study, with analyses including 117 individuals (59%) who completed the YPAS and wore the ActiGraph for 48 hr. Half the participants were male, with an overall mean age of 81.3 yr (SD = 7.9). Findings indicate that at 2 mo post–hip fracture participants were engaged in very limited levels of PA. Age and comorbidities were the only variables to be significantly associated with PA outcomes.

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Barbara Resnick, Elizabeth Galik, Marie Boltz, Erin Vigne, Sarah Holmes, Steven Fix and Shijun Zhu

The purpose of this study was to describe physical activity and function of older adults in assisted living communities and test the association between moderate and vigorous activity and falls. This study used baseline data from 393 participants from the first two cohorts in the Function-Focused Care in Assisted Living Using the Evidence Integration Triangle study. The majority of participants were female (N = 276, 70%) and White (N = 383, 97%) with a mean age of 87 years (SD = 7). Controlling for age, cognition, gender, setting, and function, the time spent in moderate or vigorous levels of physical activity was associated with having a fall in the prior 4 months. Those who engaged in more moderate physical activity were 0.6% less likely to have a fall (OR = 0.994, Wald statistic = 5.54, p = .02), and those who engaged in more vigorous activity were 2% less likely to have a fall (OR = 0.980, Wald statistic = 3.88, p = .05).