Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author: Marie-Eve Mathieu x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Georges Jabbour, Melanie Henderson, Angelo Tremblay and Marie Eve Mathieu

Objective:

Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) improves aerobic fitness in children, which is usually assessed by maximal oxygen consumption. However, other indices of aerobic fitness have been understudied.

Methods:

To compare net oxygen (VO2net), net energy consumption (Enet), net mechanical efficiency (MEnet), and lipid oxidation rate in active and inactive children across body weight statuses.

Design:

The sample included normal-weight, overweight, and obese children of whom 44 are active (≥30 min of MVPA/d) and 41 are inactive (<30 min of MVPA/d). VO2net, Enet, MEnet and lipid oxidation rate were determined during an incremental maximal cycling test.

Results:

Active obese participants had significantly lower values of VO2net and Enet and higher MEnet than inactive obese participants at all load stages. In addition, active obese participants showed a significantly higher lipid oxidation rate compared with inactive obese and active overweight and normal-weight participants. VO2net, Enet, and MEnet were similar across active children, regardless of body weight status.

Conclusion:

Thirty minutes or more of MVPA per day is associated with a potentiation of aerobic fitness indicators in obese prepubertal children. Moreover, the indices of aerobic fitness of inactive obese children are significantly different from those of active obese and nonobese ones.

Restricted access

Katya M. Herman, Gilles Paradis, Marie-Eve Mathieu, Jennifer O’Loughlin, Angelo Tremblay and Marie Lambert

This study examines the association between objectively-measured physical activity (PA) intensities and sedentary behavior (SED) in a cohort of 532 children aged 8–10 y. PA and SED were assessed by accelerometer over 7-days. Television and computer/video-game use were self-reported. Associations between PA intensities and SED variables were assessed by Spearman correlations and adjusted multiple linear regression. Higher mean daily moderate-to-vigorous and vigorous PA (MVPA, VPA) were negatively associated with mean daily SED (r = −0.47 and −0.37; p < .001), and positively associated with mean daily total PA (r = .58 and 0.46; p < .001). MVPA was also positively associated with light PA (LPA; r = .26, p < .00l). MVPA and VPA were not significantly associated with TV, computer/video or total screen time; accelerometer SED was only weakly associated with specific SED behaviors. On average, for each additional 10 min daily MVPA, children accumulated >14 min less SED, and for each additional 5 min VPA, 11 min less SED. Thus, over the course of a week, higher mean daily MVPA may displace SED time and is associated with higher total PA over and above the additional MVPA, due to concomitant higher levels of LPA. Public health strategies should target both MVPA and SED to improve overall PA and health in children.

Restricted access

Katya M. Herman, Jean-Philippe Chaput, Catherine M. Sabiston, Marie-Eve Mathieu, Angelo Tremblay and Gilles Paradis

Objective:

Individuals may achieve high physical activity (PA) yet also be highly sedentary (SED). This study assessed adiposity in children classified by PA/SED groups.

Methods:

Participants were 520 8- to 10-year-old children with ≥ 1 obese parent. Moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and SED were measured by accelerometer, and screen-time was measured by self-report. Height, weight, waist circumference (WC), body fat percentage (BF%), and VO2peak were objectively measured; energy intake was measured by dietary recall. Elevated adiposity was defined as BMI ≥ 85th percentile, WC ≥ 90th percentile, BF% ≥ 85th percentile, or waist-to-height ratio (WHR) ≥ 0.5.

Results:

Up to 27% of boys and 15% of girls were active/SED. Adiposity was lowest for active/non-SED, highest for inactive/SED, and intermediate and similar for active/SED and inactive/non-SED. Using 60 min/d MVPA and 2 h/d screen-time cut-offs, prevalence ranges for elevated adiposity in the active/non-SED, active/SED, inactive/non-SED, and inactive/SED groups were 0% to 14%, 15% to 44%, 16% to 40%, and 32% to 51%, respectively. Corresponding odds and 95% confidence intervals of being overweight/obese for the latter groups were 3.8 (95% CI, 1.7−8.4), 3.8 (1.8−8.2), and 4.9 (2.3−10.3) versus active/non-SED. PA/SED-adiposity associations were mediated by fitness but not energy intake.

Conclusions:

Combined PA/SED levels are strongly associated with adiposity in children, but associations are mediated by fitness. Active children who accumulate >2 h/d of screen time and inactive children are equally likely to be overweight/obese.

Restricted access

Baptiste Fournier, Maxime Lussier, Nathalie Bier, Johanne Filiatrault, Manon Parisien, Miguel Chagnon and Marie-Ève Mathieu

The authors examined the effects of a 12-week pole walking program on function and well-being in 123 older adults aged 60 years and older, recruited by community organizations. The results showed a significant improvement in the participants’ upper and lower limb strength in the experimental groups compared with those in the control groups (p < .05) and a significant deterioration in the walking speed and grip strength in women in the control groups compared with those in the experimental groups (p < .05). Although not statistically significant, the results also showed a trend toward greater improvement in global cognitive function in the participants in the experimental groups (p = .076). These results suggest that a pole walking program provided in natural conditions can improve physical capabilities in older adults. Other studies are warranted to further explore the impact of pole walking programs on older adults offered in such conditions, especially their impact on cognitive functions.

Restricted access

Julie Masurier, Marie-Eve Mathieu, Stephanie Nicole Fearnbach, Charlotte Cardenoux, Valérie Julian, Céline Lambert, Bruno Pereira, Martine Duclos, Yves Boirie and David Thivel

There is a growing interest regarding the effect of exercise on appetite and energy intake in youth. While the role of exercise intensity has been a primary focus of study, the effect of exercise duration on subsequent food intake has not been fully examined in obese adolescents. On three separate mornings in a randomly assigned order, obese adolescent girls (n = 20) aged 12–15 years old were asked to perform a rest session (control, CON) or two cycling sessions for 20 (EX20) or 40 min (EX40) set at their ventilatory threshold. Absolute and relative energy intake were measured from an ad libitum lunch meal 30 min after rest or exercise and appetite feelings assessed using visual analogue scales throughout the day. Hunger, satiety, and prospective food consumption were not significantly different between conditions. Absolute energy intake (kcal) did not differ between conditions, while relative energy intake on EX40 (571 ± 381 kcal) was significantly lower than during CON (702 ± 320 kcal; p < .05) and EX20 (736 ± 457 kcal; p < .05). Fat ingestion (in grams) was significantly lower on CON (7.8 ± 3.2 g) compared with EX20 (10.3 ± 4.6 g; p < .01). Protein intake (in grams) was higher on EX20 (37.0 ± 16.6 g) compared with both CON (29.5 ± 11.7 g; p < .01) and EX40 (33.1 ± 10.9 g; p < .05). However, the percentage of total energy derived from each macronutrient was not different between conditions. Obese adolescent girls do not compensate for an acute bout of exercise set at their ventilatory threshold by increasing energy intake, regardless of the exercise duration.