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Dennis Passe, Mary Horn, John Stofan, Craig Horswill and Robert Murray

This study investigated the relationship between runners’ perceptions of fluid needs and drinking behavior under conditions of compensable heat stress (ambient temperature = 20.5 ± 0.7 °C, 68.9 °F; relative humidity = 76.6%). Eighteen experienced runners (15 men, 40.5 ± 2.5 y, and 3 women, 42 ± 2.3 y) were given ad libitum access to a sports drink (6% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution) at Miles 2, 4, 6, and 8. After the run (75.5 ± 8.0 min), subjects completed questionnaires that required them to estimate their individual fluid intake and sweat loss. Dehydration averaged 1.9% ± 0.8% of initial body weight (a mean sweat loss of 21.6 ± 5.1 mL·kg−1·h−1). Subjects replaced only 30.5% ± 18.1% of sweat loss and underestimated their sweat loss by 42.5% ± 36.6% (P ≤ 0.001). Subjects’ self-estimations of fluid intake (5.2 ± 3.2 mL·kg−1·h−1) were not significantly different from actual fluid intake (6.1 ± 3.4 mL·kg−1·h−1) and were significantly correlated (r = 0.63, P = 0.005). The data indicate that even under favorable conditions, experienced runners voluntarily dehydrate (P ≤ 0.001), possibly because they are unable to accurately estimate sweat loss and consequently cannot subjectively judge how much fluid to ingest to prevent dehydration. This conclusion suggests that runners should not depend on self-assessment to maintain adequate hydration, underscores the need for runners to enhance their ability to self-assess sweat losses, and suggests that a predetermined regimen of fluid ingestion might be necessary if they wish to maintain more optimal hydration.

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Xiaocai Shi, William Bartoli, Mary Horn and Robert Murray

Eight healthy subjects, aged 39.0 ± 2.4 years, consumed four 6% carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions containing either one (glucose or fructose) or two transportable carbohydrates in single (glucose + fructose) or bound (sucrose) forms. Solution osmolalities ranged from 250 to 434 mOsm/kg H2O. The test solutions were ingested at rest in the amount of 6 ml/kg of body weight at a temperature of 12 °C. Gastric emptying rate was measured by repeated aspirations via a nasogastric tube using the modified George double-sampling technique. The intragastric temperature was determined by a temperature probe attached to the nasogastric tube. There were no significant differences in gastric emptying rates and gastric volumes among the solutions. Intragastric temperature dropped from 36.5 °C to 23.3±3 °C immediately after beverage ingestion but recovered to above 30 °C within 5 min. These data suggest that the gastric emptying rate of the specified beverages is not affected by the number and type of carbohydrates or by solution osmolalities within the tested range. Within 5 min after ingestion, cold beverages are warmed to above 30 °C in the stomach. This infers that the effect of cold solution temperature on gastric emptying rate is likely to be small and transitory.

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Dennis H. Passe, Mary Horn, John Stofan and Robert Murray

Palatability and voluntary intake of 4 beverages commonly available to athletes were compared in a laboratory exercise protocol designed to mimic aerobic training or competitive conditions in which limited time is available for drinking. Diluted orange juice (DOJ), homemade 6% carbohydrate-electrolyte sports beverage (HCE), commercially available 6% carbohydrate-electrolyte sports beverage (CCE), and water (W) were tested. Fifty adult triathletes and runners (34 males, 16 females) exercised for 75 min at 80–85% of age-predicted heart rate, during which time they were given brief access (60 s) to one of the beverages after 30 min and 60 min of exercise. Results indicated that for overall palatability, CCE > W, HCE, DOJ; W > DOJ, and for amount of beverage consumed, CCE > W, HCE, DOJ; HCE > W, DOJ. The palatability of these beverages varied substantially, as did their voluntary intakes during exercise.

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Robert Murray, William Bartoli, John Stofan, Mary Horn and Dennis Eddy

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of repeated ingestion of drinks containing varying concentrations of carbohydrate on gastric emptying rate during steady-state exercise. On five separate occasions, 14 subjects cycled for 90 min at an average power output of 151 ± 2 W. At 15-min intervals, subjects ingested 227 ± 3 ml of either water, 4% carbohydrate (CHO), 6% CHO, or 8% CHO. Gastric volume was determined prior to each drink and at 90 min using the modified double-sampling technique. Gross gastric volumes were significantly greater and mean gastric emptying rates and the percentage of ingested beverage emptied from the stomach were significantly less for 8% CHO. These data indicate that repeated ingestion of an 8% CHO beverage during exercise significantly reduces gastric emptying rate, whereas lower concentrations of carbohydrate do not. In addition, beverage osmolality is not as important as beverage energy content in influencing gastric emptying rate at these carbohydrate concentrations.

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Anthony D. Mahon, Megan E. Woodruff, Mary P. Horn, Andrea D. Marjerrison and Andrew S. Cole

The effect of stimulant medication use by children with attention deficit/hyper-activity disorder (ADHD) on the rating of perceived exertion (RPE)—heart rate (HR) relationship was examined. Children with ADHD (n = 20; 11.3 ± 1.8 yrs) and children without ADHD (n = 25; 11.2 ± 2.1 yrs) were studied. Children with ADHD were examined while on their usual dose of medication on the day of study. HR and RPE, using the OMNI RPE scale, were assessed during a graded exercise to peak voluntary effort. The RPE-HR relationship was determined individually and the intercept and slope responses were compared between groups. The intercept was 132.4 ± 19.5 bpm for children with ADHD and 120.6 ± 15.7 bpm for children without ADHD. The slope was 7.3 ± 1.9 bpm/RPE for the children with ADHD and 8.1 ± 1.6 bpm/RPE for the children without ADHD. For the group with ADHD the intercept and slope values fell outside of the 95% CI observed in the control group. The altered relationship between RPE and HR with stimulant medication use in children with ADHD has practical implications with respect to the use of HR and RPE to monitor exercise intensity.

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Robert Murray, William P. Bartoli, Dennis E. Eddy and Mary K. Horn

The purpose of this study was to compare the gastric emptying rates (GER) of water, a 6% carbohydrate (CHO) beverage, and a 20% CHO beverage and to contrast those rates against the rate at which deuterium oxide in the drinks accumulated in plasma (DAR) following beverage ingestion. Ten subjects (8 males, 2 females) cycled at 60% VO2max for 70 min; at 13 min, the subjects ingested 400 ml of one of the beverages. The GER and DAR of water and 6% CHO were similar, while GER and DAR were both significantly slowed by ingestion of 20% CHO. Although there was a significant correlation (r = .63, p < .05) between GER and DAR, only 40% of the variation in DAR could be accounted for by variation in GER. These data support the contention that DAR is partially determined by GER, with differences in the rate of fluid absorption across the intestine and other factors accounting for the remaining variation in DAR.

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Rachel D. Smetanka, C. Patrick Lambert, Robert Murray, Dennis Eddy, Mary Horn and Carl V. Gisolfi

Abdominal cramping, nausea, diarrhea, and GI bleeding are often reported in long-distance runners. This study set out to determine the effects of prolonged (2-4 hrs) exercise and NSAID ingestion on gastric and intestinal permeability during the first 5 hrs following the 1996 Chicago Marathon. Thirty-four healthy volunteers (20 M, 14 F; ages 30-50) completed the race and ingested the test solution (5 g sucrose, 5 g lactulose, 2 g rhamnose, in 40 ml water) within 10-15 min. The urinary excretion ratio of lactulose/rhamnose was used to assess small intestine permeability; sucrose excretion was used to evaluate gastric impairment. There were no significant differences for mean training mileage, postrace rectal temperature, and percent dehydration between runners who ingested NSAIDs and those who did not. In all, 75% of subjects reported aspirin or ibuprofen ingestion before or during the race. Runners who ingested ibuprofen had significant elevations in urinary lactulose excretion and lactulose/rhamnose ratio, whereas those who ingested aspirin or who did not ingest either NSAID had no significant differences in urinary excretion of lactulose, rhamnose, sucrose, or lactulose/rhamnose ratio compared to resting controls. Thirteen of the 26 NSAID users and 4 of the 8 non-users reported GI symptoms. It is concluded that (a) ibuprofen but not aspirin ingestion during prolonged exercise may increase gastrointestinal permeability and lead to GI symptoms, and (b) prolonged exercise alone can produce GI symptoms.

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Andrew S. Cole, Megan E. Woodruff, Mary P. Horn and Anthony D. Mahon

Relationships between physiological parameters and 5-km running performance were examined in 15 male runners (17.3 ± 0.9 years). Running economy (RE) and blood lactate concentration ([BLa]) at 241.2 m/min, VO2max, velocity at VO2max (vVO2max), vertical jump height and muscle power, and isokinetic knee extension strength at 60°/sec and 240°/sec were measured. The participants’ best 5-km race time over the last month of the cross-country season (16.98 ± 0.76 min) was used in the analysis. The data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficients. Significant relationships to run time were observed for VO2max (r = -.53), RE (r = .55), and vVO2max (r = -.66), but not [BLa], isokinetic muscle torque, or vertical jump. Identifying the unique strength and power characteristics related to running performance in this age group is warranted.

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Craig A. Horswill, Dennis H. Passe, John R. Stofan, Mary K. Horn and Robert Murray

We compared ad libitum fluid consumption in adolescent (n = 15) and adult athletes (n = 34) exercising in similar environmental conditions (26.5°C, 27.3% relative humidity) and similar modes and intensities of exercise (80-85% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate). Throughout 1 hr of exercise, participants had access to sports bottles containing a sports drink (6% carbohydrate with electrolytes and identical flavoring). Sweat rate (SR) and percent dehydration were calculated from the change in body weight corrected for urine loss and fluid intake (FI). FI was significantly higher for the adults than for the adolescents. SR was also higher for the adults compared with that of the adolescents. Compared with adults, adolescents had significantly lower FI and SR, the combination of which allowed them to meet their fluid needs more closely during exercise. Minimal voluntary dehydration occurred in either group during exercise, possibly because of the nature of the exercise (noncompetitive) or the beverage characteristics (presence of sodium and sweetness) or availability of the beverage.

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Melissa Hodge, Mary Hovinga, Kelley Gabriel, Linda Snetselaar, John Shepherd, Linda Van Horn, Victor Stevens, Brian Egleston, Alan Robson, Seungyoun Jung and Joanne Dorgan

This study prospectively investigates associations between youth moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and body composition in young adult women using data from the Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC) and the DISC06 Follow-Up Study. MVPA was assessed by questionnaire on 5 occasions between the ages 8 and 18 years and at age 25-29 years in 215 DISC female participants. Using whole body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), overall adiposity and body fat distribution were assessed at age 25-29 years by percent body fat (%fat) and android-to-gynoid (A:G) fat ratio, respectively. Linear mixed effects models and generalized linear latent and mixed models were used to assess associations of youth MVPA with both outcomes. Young adult MVPA, adjusted for other young adult characteristics, was significantly inversely associated with young adult %fat (%fat decreased from 37.4% in the lowest MVPA quartile to 32.8% in the highest (p-trend = 0.02)). Adjusted for youth and young adult characteristics including young adult MVPA, youth MVPA also was significantly inversely associated with young adult %fat (β=-0.40 per 10 MET-hrs/wk, p = .02) . No significant associations between MVPA and A:G fat ratio were observed. Results suggest that youth and young adult MVPA are important independent predictors of adiposity in young women.