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Meghan Warren, Craig A. Smith and Nicole J. Chimera

Context:

The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) evaluates performance in 7 fundamental movement patterns using a 4-point scale. Previous studies have reported increased injury risk with a composite score (CS) of 14/21 or less; these studies were limited to specific sports and injury definition.

Objective:

To examine the association between FMS CS and movement pattern scores and acute noncontact and overuse musculoskeletal injuries in division I college athletes. An exploratory objective was to assess the association between injury and FMS movement pattern asymmetry.

Design:

Prospective cohort.

Setting:

College athletic facilities.

Participants:

167 injury-free, college basketball, football, volleyball, cross country, track and field, swimming/diving, soccer, golf, and tennis athletes (males = 89).

Intervention:

The FMS was administered during preparticipation examination.

Main Outcome Measure:

Noncontact or overuse injuries that required intervention from the athletic trainer during the sport season.

Results:

FMS CS was not different between those injured (n = 74; 14.3 ± 2.5) and those not (14.1 ± 2.4; P = .57). No point on the ROC curve maximized sensitivity and specificity; therefore previously published cut-point was used for analysis with injury (≤14 [n = 92]). After adjustment, no statistically significant association between FMS CS and injury (odds ratio [OR] = 1.01, 95% CI 0.53–1.91) existed. Lunge was the only movement pattern that was associated with injury; those scoring 2 were less likely to have an injury vs those who scored 3 (OR = 0.21, 95% CI 0.08–0.59). There was also no association between FMS movement pattern asymmetry and injury.

Conclusion:

FMS CS, movement patterns, and asymmetry were poor predictors of noncontact and overuse injury in this cohort of division I athletes.

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Nicole J. Chimera, Monica R. Lininger and Meghan Warren

Clinical Question: Can text message be used for epidemiologic data collection and accurate injury reporting in recreational and club sport participation? Clinical Bottom Line: Text message may be advantageous for injury surveillance in recreational exercise and club sport participation. This novel method may provide a more complete understanding of injury rates as this tool allows for more immediate recall of injury exposures and incidences. Further, data suggest that injuries are reported more often via text message compared to those reported to health care personnel.

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Ricky Camplain, Julie A. Baldwin, Meghan Warren, Carolyn Camplain, Monica R. Lininger and Robert T. Trotter

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Margaret Delaney, Meghan Warren, Brian Kinslow, Hendrik de Heer and Kathleen Ganley

Disability is a tremendous public health challenge. No study has assessed whether meeting U.S. Physical Activity guidelines is associated with disability in mobility tasks, activities of daily living, and social participation among U.S. older adults. Using 2011–2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, this study examined this relationship among 8,309 individuals aged ≥50 years. Most participants (n = 4,272) did not achieve guidelines, and 2,912 participants were completely inactive. People who did not meet guidelines had higher odds of disability compared with those who did (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.80) in addition to difficulty with mobility tasks (AOR = 1.85), activities of daily living (AOR = 1.66), and social participation (AOR = 2.09). There was a dose–response effect for each level of activity (inactive, insufficient, and meeting and exceeding recommendations). Among adults aged ≥50 years, meeting the U.S. guidelines was associated with better social and physical functioning.