Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 42 items for

  • Author: Melinda Solmon x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Melinda Solmon and Ron McBride

Restricted access

Melinda Solmon and Ron McBride

Restricted access

Melinda Solmon and Ron McBride

Restricted access

Melinda Solmon and Ron McBride

Restricted access

Melinda Solmon and Ron McBride

Restricted access

Melinda Solmon and Ron McBride

Restricted access

Melinda Solmon and Ron McBride

Restricted access

Melinda A. Solmon

Academic integrity is a fundamental value, and maintaining it is central to achieving the mission of providing high-quality instructional programs. Cheating in academic settings is a widespread problem, and the perception is that the proliferation of technology in recent years has compounded this concern. This paper provides an overview of the issues related to academic dishonesty and the problems associated with cheating on college campuses. Academic misconduct in online courses and programs is discussed, and a variety of ways that technology can be used by students to cheat are described. Strategies are offered that can be used to decrease cheating and promote ethical behavior. It is the responsibility of faculty and administrators to take steps to deter academic misconduct and to strive to create a culture of academic integrity.

Full access

Melinda A. Solmon

Scholarship related to physical education and sport pedagogy is rigorous and should be central to the academic discipline of kinesiology. The goal of this article is to situate physical education and sport pedagogy as an applied field in kinesiology, grounded in the assumption that physical education, as the professional or technical application of the broader academic discipline, is of critical importance to the success of kinesiology. A brief overview of the history of research on teaching physical education is followed by an overview of the streams of research that have evolved. Major tenets of research on effective teaching and curricular reform are discussed. The status of physical education teacher education and school physical education programs is considered, and a rationale for a broader view of pedagogy that has the potential not only to promote physical education and sport pedagogy but also to enrich the academic discipline is offered.

Restricted access

Melinda A. Solmon