Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Mette Aadahl x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Stine Kloster, Ida Høgstedt Danquah, Andreas Holtermann, Mette Aadahl and Janne Schurmann Tolstrup

Background:

Harmful health effects associated with sedentary behavior may be attenuated by breaking up long periods of sitting by standing or walking. However, studies assess interruptions in sitting time differently, making comparisons between studies difficult. It has not previously been described how the definition of minimum break duration affects sitting outcomes. Therefore, the aim was to address how definitions of break length affect total sitting time, number of sit-to-stand transitions, prolonged sitting periods and time accumulated in prolonged sitting periods among office workers.

Methods:

Data were collected from 317 office workers. Thigh position was assessed with an ActiGraph GT3X+ fixed on the right thigh. Data were exported with varying bout length of breaks. Afterward, sitting outcomes were calculated for the respective break lengths.

Results:

Absolute numbers of sit-to-stand transitions decreased, and number of prolonged sitting periods and total time accumulated in prolonged sitting periods increased, with increasing minimum break length. Total sitting time was not influenced by varying break length.

Conclusions:

The definition of minimum break length influenced the sitting outcomes with the exception of total sitting time. A standard definition of break length is needed for comparison and interpretation of studies in the evolving research field of sedentary behavior.

Restricted access

Jeanette Frost Ebstrup, Mette Aadahl, Lene Falgaard Eplov, Charlotta Pisinger and Torben Jørgensen

Background:

Leisure-time sitting-time (LTST) is seen as a possible independent risk-factor for physical and mental health, but research on psychological determinants is sparse. Associations between sitting-time and the personality dimensions of neuroticism, extroversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, and the role of general self-efficacy (GSE) were investigated.

Methods:

A population-based, cross-sectional study was conducted at the Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Denmark, in 2006−08. Men and women (N = 3471) aged 18 to 69, were randomly sampled in the suburbs of Copenhagen. The NEO Five-Factor Inventory, the General Self-Efficacy-Scale, and the Physical Activity Scale 2 were used.

Results:

Negative associations were found between LTST and extroversion, conscientiousness, and openness, while neuroticism showed a positive association (R 2 = .13). The associations with agreeableness became significantly positive, when GSE was included. All 5 associations were mediated by GSE, with mediation proportions between 23%−60%; but with modest effect sizes.

Conclusions:

These cross-sectional results indicate that personality traits and GSE could be considered as associates of LTST; but future longitudinal data are necessary to make causal statements and rule out alternative models fitting data.