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Eric Maylia, John A. Fairclough, Leonard D.M. Nokes and Michael D. Jones

Thigh girth is often used as an indicator of muscle hypertrophy or atrophy during the rehabilitation process following knee surgery. The measurement of thigh girth, using a conventional plastic tape measure, in an attempt to detect muscle hypertrophy or atrophy may be misleading. It is an inaccurate measure of thigh muscle bulk. Although the sample size is small, the results show that measurements are heavily biased by the expectations of observers, with the result that a considerable change in thigh girth is likely to be ignored.

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Eric Maylia, John A. Fairclough, Leonard D.M. Nokes and Michael D. Jones

The purpose of this study was to assess whether measurements of thigh bulk taken with a tape measure would give an indication of muscle power. Eleven male patients, all undergoing unilateral menisectomies, performed exercises of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles during concentric loading at 60°/s. The patients were tested three times over a 12-week period: one day before the operation and 2 and 12 weeks after the operation. Thigh girth was recorded, using a conventional plastic tape measure, 10 cm from the top of the patella in each of the three test sessions. The results of this study demonstrated that muscle power cannot be predicted from thigh girth measurements.

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Martin D. Hoffman, Philip S. Clifford, Božo Bota, Michael Mandli and Gregory M. Jones

A theoretical analysis was used to evaluate the effect of body mass on the mechanical power cost of cross-country skiing and roller skiing on flat terrain. The relationships between body mass and the power cost of overcoming friction were found to be different between cross-country skiing on snow and roller skiing. Nevertheless, it was predicted that the heavier skier should have a lower oxygen cost per unit of body mass for roller skiing, as is the case for snow skiing. To determine whether the theoretical analysis was supported by experimental data, oxygen consumption measurements were performed during roller skiing by six male cross-country ski racers who spanned a 17.3-kg range in body mass. The theoretical analysis was supported by the experimental findings of decreases in oxygen consumption for each kg increase in body mass of approximately 1.0% for the double pole technique, 1.8% for the kick double pole technique, and 0.6% for the VI skate technique.