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Paul J. Cribb, Andrew D. Williams, Michael F. Carey, and Alan Hayes

Different dietary proteins affect whole body protein anabolism and accretion and therefore, have the potential to influence results obtained from resistance training. This study examined the effects of supplementation with two proteins, hydrolyzed whey isolate (WI) and casein (C), on strength, body composition, and plasma glutamine levels during a 10 wk, supervised resistance training program. In a double-blind protocol, 13 male, recreational bodybuilders supplemented their normal diet with either WI or C (1.5 gm/kg body wt/d) for the duration of the program. Strength was assessed by 1-RM in three exercises (barbell bench press, squat, and cable pull-down). Body composition was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Plasma glutamine levels were determined by the enzymatic method with spectrophotometric detection. All assessments occurred in the week before and the week following 10 wk of training. Plasma glutamine levels did not change in either supplement group following the intervention. The WI group achieved a significantly greater gain (P < 0.01) in lean mass than the C group (5.0 ± 0.3 vs. 0.8 ± 0.4 kg for WI and C, respectively) and a significant (P < 0.05) change in fat mass (−1.5 ± 0.5 kg) compared to the C group (+0.2 ± 0.3 kg). The WI group also achieved significantly greater (P < 0.05) improvements in strength compared to the C group in each assessment of strength. When the strength changes were expressed relative to body weight, the WI group still achieved significantly greater (P < 0.05) improvements in strength compared to the C group.

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Andrew J. McAinch, Mark A. Febbraio, Joann M. Parkin, Shuang Zhao, Kathy Tangalakis, Lilian Stojanovska, and Michael F. Carey

This study tested the hypothesis that active recovery between bouts of intense aerobic exercise would lead to better maintenance of exercise performance in the second bout of exercise. Seven trained men on 2 separate occasions (VO2peak = 58.3 ± 9.4 ml · kg–1 · min–1) performed as much work as possible during two 20-min cycling exercise bouts, separated by a 15-min recovery period. During passive recovery (PR), subjects rested supine, while during active recovery (AR) subjects continued to cycle at 40% VO2peak. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were obtained. Neither muscle glycogen or lactate was different when comparing AR with PR at any point. In contrast, plasma lactate concentration was higher (p < .05) in PR versus AR during the recovery period, such that subjects commenced the second bout of intense exercise with a lower (p < .05) plasma lactate concentration in AR (4.4 ± 0.7 vs. 7.7 ± 1.4 mmol · L–1 following AR and PR, respectively). Work performed in Bout 2 was less than that performed in Bout 1 in both trials (p < .01), with no difference in work performed between trials. These data do not support the benefit of AR when compared to PR in the maintenance of subsequent intense aerobic exercise performance.