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Michael Metzler

A debate over the quality of teacher education programs has been ongoing for nearly 100 years. The most current round in this debate started with Α Nation at Risk (National Commission on Excellence in Education, 1983) and has escalated in recent years to involve an increasing number of participant-constituents, each of whom has voiced an opinion about the preparation of teachers. The purpose of this article is to analyze several of the key participant-constituents in this debate in regards to their expressed warrants, authority, rhetoric, and strategic action plans for improving teacher education. The paper will conclude with some prognostications about how the results of this debate could influence the conduct of P–12 physical education programs and, by extension, physical education teacher education in coming years.

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Michael Metzler

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Michael Metzler

This article provides a representative review of the current literature on time-related research in sport pedagogy. The reviewed studies are presented and discussed in four general areas: how time has been conceptualized, how time has been measured, what is known about how time is spent in physical education and sport settings, and what is still left to be known about time-related events. The final section suggests a six-item agenda for expanding and continuing research on time in sport pedagogy.

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Michael Metzler

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Michael Metzler

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Michael W. Metzler

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Michael W. Metzler

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Michael W. Metzler

This thematic article is based upon personal reflections and tangible evidence that the emphasis in sport pedagogy has shifted away from doing research on instruction and toward doing research on teachers. Several contributing factors to this trend are discussed along with implications for continued change in the patterns of sport pedagogy. Suggestions are made that could alter these patterns and address how to conduct research on teaching that is both meaningful to practice and valued in the academy. Finally, there is a call to question the role of traditional sport disciplines and subdisciplines in the conduct of professional practice and the conceptualization of sport pedagogy.