Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author: Michael P. Ernst x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Michael P. Ernst and Robert P. Pangrazi

The proliferation of research on physical activity paints a clear picture regarding the health benefits of increasing levels of physical activity. In the present study, the efficacy of a school-based physical activity intervention (Promoting Lifetime Activity for Youth) was examined. Twenty-eight 4th-, 5th-, and 6th-grade elementary school teachers and their students participated in this study. Treatment group classes received the P.L.A.Y. intervention. Control group classes received a placebo. Participants completed 2 questionnaires 3 times during the study. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for all analyses. Results indicate that the treatment group significantly increased physical activity levels. Control group classes did not significantly increase activity levels or attraction to activity.

Restricted access

Scott W. Cheatham, Morey J. Kolber and Michael P. Ernst

Context:

Pulse rate is commonly measured manually or with commercial wrist or belt monitors. More recently, pulse-rate monitoring has become convenient with the use of mobile technology that allows monitoring through a smartphone camera. This optical technology offers many benefits, although the clinimetric properties have not been extensively studied.

Design:

Observational study of reliability.

Setting:

University kinesiology laboratory.

Participants:

30 healthy, recreationally active adults.

Intervention:

Concurrent measurement of pulse rate using 2 smartphone applications (fingertip, face-scan,) with the Polar H7 belt and pulse oximeter.

Main Outcome Measure:

Average resting pulse rate for 5 min in 3 positions (supine, sitting, and prone).

Results:

Concurrent validity in supine and standing was good between the 2 applications and the Polar H7 (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] .80–.98) and pulse oximeter (ICC .82–98). For sitting, the validity was good between the fingertip application, Polar H7 (ICC .97), and pulse oximeter (ICC .97). The face-scan application had moderate validity with the Polar H7 (ICC .74) and pulse oximeter (ICC .69). The minimal detectable change (MDC90) between the fingertip application and Polar H7 ranged from 1.38 to 4.36 beats/min (BPM) and from 0.69 to 2.97 BPM for the pulse oximeter with both positions. The MDC90 between the face-scan application and Polar H7 ranged from 11.88 to 12.83 BPM and from 0.59 to 17.72 BPM for the pulse oximeter. The 95% limits of agreement suggest that the fingertip application may vary between 2.40 and 3.59 BPM with the Polar H7 and between 3.40 and 3.42 BPM with the pulse oximeter. The face-scan application may vary between 3.46 and 3.52 BPM with the Polar H7 and between 2.54 and 3.46 BPM with the pulse oximeter.

Conclusion:

Pulse-rate measurements may be effective using a fingertip application, belt monitor, and pulse oximeter. The fingertip scanner showed superior results compared with the face scanner, which only demonstrated modest validity compared with the Polar H7 and pulse oximeter.

Restricted access

Michael P. Ernst, Charles B. Corbin, Aaron Beighle and Robert P. Pangrazi

While the FITNESSGRAM ® test battery is widely used in schools, not all users are aware of the FITNESSGRAM position paper as outlined in the Reference Manual, and for this reason may fail to use FITNESSGRAM materials as intended. The purpose of this paper is to outline the many appropriate uses, and some inappropriate uses, of FITNESSGRAM. Because California is a state that employs the FITNESSGRAM as its state fitness test, examples from California are used. Suggestions for future uses of fitness testing are included.

Restricted access

Scott Cheatham, Morey J. Kolber and Michael P. Ernst

Context:

Pulse oximetry has become mobile with the use of smartphone and Bluetooth wireless technology. This technology offers many benefits but has not been extensively studied. There is a need to further validate its clinimetric properties for health professionals to provide proper guidance to patients.

Objective:

This investigation assessed the concurrent validity of the iSpO2 pulse oximeter against a traditional pulse oximeter in measuring short-term resting blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and pulse rate.

Design:

Observational study of reliability.

Setting:

University kinesiology laboratory.

Participants:

Thirty healthy, recre-ationally active adults (18 men, 12 women; mean age = 25.7 ± 5.46 years, mean height = 170.3cm ± 9.51, mean body mass = 76.4 kg ± 19.33).

Intervention:

Resting measurement of SpO2 and pulse rate using the iSpO2 pulse oximeter with the iPad Mini and a traditional pulse oximeter with Bluetooth.

Main Outcome Measure:

Resting SpO2 and pulse rate were concurrently measured over 5 min.

Results:

The concurrent validity between the iSpO2 and traditional pulse oximeter was moderate for measuring SpO2, intraclass correlation coeffcient (ICC)(3, 1) = .73, SEM = 0.70%, and good for pulse rate, ICC(3, 1) = .97, SEM = 1.74 beats per minute (bpm). The minimal detectable change at the 95% confidence interval for both instruments suggests that there may be 1.94% disagreement for SpO2 and 4.82 bpm disagreement between pulse oximetry methods. The 95% limits of agreement (LoA) for measuring SpO2 suggests that the iSpO2 and traditional pulse oximeters may vary -0.28 ± 1.98%, or approximately 2%. The 95% LoA for measuring pulse rate suggests that the iSpO2 and traditional pulse oximeter may vary 1.74 ± 4.98 bpm, potentially upward of 6 bpm. On the basis of the results of the LoA, it appears that there may be a slight systematic bias between the two devices, with the traditional pulse oximeter producing higher pulse rates than the iSpO2.

Conclusion:

The findings suggest that both instruments may be beneficial for indirect short-term measurements of resting SpO2 and pulse rate.