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Carl M. Maresh, Lawrence E. Armstrong, Jay R. Hoffman, Daniel R. Hannon, Catherine L. V. Gabaree, Michael F. Bergeron, Michael J. Whittlesey, and Michael R. Deschenes

In the present study, the effects of an increased daily dose of a dietary supplement (ATP-E, 0.2 g · kg1 · day1) on Wingate test performance were examined in 12 men (21 ± 1.6 years) prior to and following 14 days of supplement and placebo ingestion. A double-blind and counterbalanced design was used. Results revealed higher (p < .007) preexercise blood ATP (95.4 ± 10.5 μmol · dl1) for the entire group following 14 days of ATP-E ingestion compared to placebo measures (87.6 ± 10.9 μmol · dl1). Mean power (667 ± 73 W) was higher (p < .008) after 14 days of ATP-E ingestion versus placebo (619 ± 67 W). Peak plasma lactate was lower (p < .07) after 14 days of ATP-E ingestion (14.9 ± 2.8 mmol · L1) compared to placebo (16.3 ± 1.6 mmol · L1). These data suggested that the improvement in 30-s Wingate test performance in this group may be related to the increased dose of ATP-E.

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Carl M. Maresh, Catherine L. Gabaree, Jay R. Hoffman, Daniel R. Hannon, Michael R. Deschenes, Lawrence E. Armstrong, Avron Abraham, Frederick E. Bailey, and William J. Kraemer

To examine the effect of a nutritional supplement (ATP-E™) on high intensity exercise performance, 23 physically active males volunteered to perform six Wingate Anaerobic Power tests. Tests were performed prior to and at 14 and 21 days during ATP-E~o~r placebo ingestion. f i e experiment followed a double-blind and random-order design. Twelve subjects (responders, R) showed an increase in preexercise blood ATP on Day 14 of ATP-E™ ingestion compared to control measures. The remaining 11 subjects (nonresponders, NR) had no change in pree~e~cibselo od ATP. Peak power and mean power were unchanged for both R and NR subjects across the exercise tests, but R experienced a decrease (p < 0.05) in immediate postexercise plasma lactate on Day 14 of ATP-E™ testing compared to their control measures. NR had no change in peak plasma lactate at any time during the study. The results suggest that short-term high intensity exercise performance was maintained in R with less reliance on anaerobic metabolism, and that response was evident following 14 days of ATP-E™ ingestion.