Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author: Michael Walsh x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Jennifer Ryan, Michael Walsh and John Gormley

This study investigated the ability of published cut points for the RT3 accelerometer to differentiate between levels of physical activity intensity in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Oxygen consumption (metabolic equivalents; METs) and RT3 data (counts/min) were measured during rest and 5 walking trials. METs and corresponding counts/min were classified as sedentary, light physical activity (LPA), and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) according to MET thresholds. Counts were also classified according to published cut points. A published cut point exhibited an excellent ability to classify sedentary activity (sensitivity = 89.5%, specificity = 100.0%). Classification accuracy decreased when published cut points were used to classify LPA (sensitivity = 88.9%, specificity = 79.6%) and MVPA (sensitivity = 70%, specificity = 95–97%). Derivation of a new cut point improved classification of both LPA and MVPA. Applying published cut points to RT3 accelerometer data collected in children with CP may result in misclassification of LPA and MVPA.

Restricted access

Michael Ross

Column-editor : Katie Walsh

Restricted access

Michael J. Zurawlew, Jessica A. Mee and Neil P. Walsh

Purpose: Recommendations state that to acquire the greatest benefit from heat-acclimation, the clock time of heat-acclimation sessions should match that of expected exercise-heat stress. It remains unknown if adaptations by postexercise hot-water immersion (HWI) demonstrate time-of-day-dependent adaptations. Thus, the authors examined whether adaptations following postexercise HWI completed in the morning were present during morning and afternoon exercise-heat stress. Methods: Ten males completed an exercise-heat stress test commencing in the morning (9:45 AM) and afternoon (2:45 PM; 40 min; 65% of maximal oxygen uptake treadmill run) before and after heat-acclimation. The 6-d heat-acclimation intervention involved a daily 40-min treadmill run (65% of maximal oxygen uptake) in temperate conditions followed by ≤40-min HWI (40°C; 6:30–11:00 AM). Results: Adaptations by 6-d postexercise HWI in the morning were similar in the morning and afternoon. Reductions in resting rectal temperature (T re) (AM −0.34°C [0.24°C], PM −0.27°C [0.23°C]; P = .002), T re at sweating onset (AM −0.34°C [0.24°C], PM −0.31°C [0.25°C]; P = .001), and end-exercise T re (AM −0.47°C [0.33°C], PM −0.43°C [0.29°C]; P = .001), heart rate (AM −14 [7] beats·min−1, PM −13 [6] beats·min−1; P < .01), rating of perceived exertion (P = .01), and thermal sensation (P = .005) were not different in the morning compared with the afternoon. Conclusion: Morning heat acclimation by postexercise HWI induced adaptations at rest and during exercise-heat stress in the morning and midafternoon.

Restricted access

Michael Gleeson, Andrew K. Blannin, Neil P. Walsh, Nicolette C. Bishop and Anya M. Clark

We examined the effects of a low-carbohydrate (CHO) diet on the plasma glutamine and circulating leukocyte responses to prolonged strenuous exercise. Twelve untrained male subjects cycled for 60 min at 70% of maximal oxygen uptake on two separate occasions, 3 days apart. All subjects performed the first exercise task after a normal diet: they completed the second exercise task after 3 days on either a high-CHO diet (75±8% CHO, n = 6) or a low-CHO diet (7±4% CHO, n = 6). The low-CHO diet was associated with a larger rise in plasma cortisol during exercise, a greater fall in the plasma glutamine concentration during recovery, and a larger neutrophilia during the postexercise period. Exercise on the high-CHO diet did not affect levels of plasma glutamine and circulating leukocytes. We conclude that CHO availability can influence the plasma glutamine andcirculaling leukocyte responses during recovery from intense prolonged exercise.

Restricted access

Neil P. Walsh, Andrew K. Blannin, Nicolette C. Bishop, Paula J. Robson and Michael Gleeson

Recent studies have shown that neutrophils can utilize glutamine and that glutamine supplementation can improve neutrophil function in postoperative and burn patients. The present study investigated the influence of oral glutamine supplementation on stimulated neutrophil degranulation and oxidative burst activity following prolonged exercise. Subjects, 7 well-trained men, reported to the laboratory following an overnight fast and cycled for 2 hrs at 60% VO2max on two occasions a week apart. They were randomly assigned to either a glutamine or placebo treatment. For both trials, subjects consumed a sugar-free lemon drink at 15-min intervals until 90 minutes, then a lemon flavored glutamine drink (GLN) or sugar-free lemon drink (PLA) was consumed at 15-min intervals for the remaining exercise and the 2-hr recovery period. Venous blood samples were taken pre-, during, and postexercise. Glutamine supplementation had no effect on the magnitude of postexercise leukocytosis, the plasma elastase concentration following exercise (which increased in both trials), or the plasma elastase release in response to bacterial stimulation (which fell in both trials). Neutrophil function assessed by oxidative burst activity of isolated cells did not change following exercise in either trial. These findings therefore suggest that the fall in plasma glutamine concentration does not account for the decrease in neutrophil function (degranulation response) following prolonged exercise.

Restricted access

Nicolette C. Bishop, Neil P. Walsh, Donna L. Haines, Emily E. Richards and Michael Gleeson

Ingesting carbohydrate (CHO) beverages during heavy exercise is associated with smaller changes in the plasma concentrations of several cytokines. The influence of dietary CHO availability on these responses has not been determined. Therefore, the present study investigated the influence of pre-exercise CHO status on plasma interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) responses to prolonged cycling. Seven trained male cyclists performed a glycogen-lowering bout of cycling and were randomly assigned to follow a diet ensuring either greater than 70% (HIGH) or less than 10% (LOW) of daily energy intake from CHO for the next 3 days. On day 4 subjects performed an exercise test that comprised cycling for 1 hour at 60% Wmax immediately followed by a time-trial (TT) ensuring an energy expenditure equivalent to cycling for 30 min at 80% Wmax. Subjects repeated the protocol after 7 days, this time following the second diet. The order of the trials was counterbalanced. At 1 and 2 hours post-TT, plasma concentrations of IL-6 and IL-10 were 2-fold greater on the LOW trial than on the HIGH trial, and peak plasma concentrations of TL-1ra were 9-fold greater on the LOW trial than on the HIGH trial. These findings suggest that pre-exercise CHO status can influence the plasma cytokine response to prolonged cycling.

Restricted access

Nicolette C. Bishop, Neil P. Walsh, Donna L. Haines, Emily E. Richards and Michael Gleeson

Ingesting carbohydrate (CHO) beverages during heavy exercise is associated with smaller shifts in numbers of circulating neutrophils and attenuated changes in neutrophil functional responses. The influence of dietary CHO availability on these responses has not been determined. Therefore, the present study investigated the influence of pre-exercise CHO status on circulating neutrophil and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated neutrophil degranulation responses to prolonged cycling. Twelve trained male cyclists performed a glycogen-lowering bout of cycling and were randomly assigned to follow a diet ensuring either greater than 70% (HIGH) or less than 10% (LOW) of daily energy intake from CHO for the next 3 days. On day 4, subjects performed an exercise test that comprised cycling for 1 hour at 60% Wmax immediately followed by a time-trial (TT) ensuring an energy expenditure equivalent to cycling for 30 min at 80% Wmax. Subjects repeated the protocol after 7 days, this time following the second diet. The order of the trials was counterbalanced. At TT completion, the HIGH compared with the LOW trial was associated with higher plasma glucose concentration, lower plasma cortisol concentration, and lower circulating neutrophil count. LPS-stimulated neutrophil degranulation per cell fell similarly on both trials. These findings suggest that pre-exercise CHO status influences neutrophil trafficking but not function in response to prolonged cycling.