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  • Author: Michelle I. Jongenelis x
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Rajni Rai, Michelle I. Jongenelis, Ben Jackson, Robert U. Newton and Simone Pettigrew

According to ecological models of behavior, the physical environment can influence physical activity engagement by a series of mediating and moderating processes. This study tested such a model to identify factors relevant to older adults’ engagement in moderate–vigorous physical activity. Sociodemographic, psychological, physical, and environmental factors were assessed in 432 Western Australians aged 60 and older. Moderate–vigorous physical activity was measured objectively using accelerometers. No environmental variables were related to engagement in moderate–vigorous physical activity either directly or indirectly. However, various individual-level factors were significant, indicating that these may be more important than environmental factors in locations such as Australia that have generally conducive environments and ambient conditions.

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Rajni Rai, Michelle I. Jongenelis, Ben Jackson, Robert U. Newton and Simone Pettigrew

Retirement has been identified as a life transition that is important in determining older adults’ physical activity levels. The present study examined the factors associated with retirement that affect physical activity participation among older adults. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 425 retired Australians aged 60 years and older. Physical activity was assessed objectively, using accelerometers. Two categories of factors affecting physical activity participation following retirement were identified: the various physical and psychological changes in later life that can encourage or discourage physical activity and the adaptation processes undertaken by older people in response to these changes. The adoption of either a gain or loss approach to retirement and aging appeared to be the most influential adaptation factor affecting physical activity participation. The results suggest that intervention approaches should aim to foster more positive attitudes to aging and retirement and promote physical activity at all stages in life.