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Murray F. Mitchell

This study focused on the behavior of a proportional, stratified random sample of 40 physical education methods teacher educators (PEMTEs) in the state of Ohio, or more specifically, on the professional implications of their scholarly behaviors. The focal questions addressed were (a) how do PEMTEs meet their responsibility to stay current in their professional areas, and (b) what are the professional implications of these efforts? Four specific behaviors were examined as evidence of scholarly behaviors: (a) reading professional journals, (b) writing for publication, (c) attendance at professional conferences, and (d) active involvement in research. Findings were then contrasted to findings from previous studies of physical educators, education professors, and university professors. PEMTEs in Ohio tend to read the professional literature related to physical education without attending to the literature in the broader realm of education. Few of the PEMTEs in Ohio write for publication or are actively involved with research—behaviors shared with other physical educators, education professors, and many university professors. PEMTEs appear to attend more state and national meetings than do other physical educators or other university professors. The extent of involvement at such conferences, however, is unknown. Implications of the behaviors described are discussed, and conclusions are drawn on the basis of the reported data.

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Murray F. Mitchell

Information about whose knowledge is accepted as important is valuable in understanding how a profession evolves. The term elders describes the individuals who control invisible networks of prestige and who determine what information is accepted for publication in professional journals. These published works stand as the foundation for the knowledge base of a discipline. The purpose of this article was to identify the elders in physical education teacher education (PETE) and to trace their academic genealogy. Elders were defined as major contributors to the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education from 1981 through 1989. The articles published by these subjects were generally, but not exclusively, research-related. Hence, aspects related to faculty research performance were selected as descriptors that may facilitate comparisons of PETE professors to other groups of professors and to future PETE professors. Subjects’ gender, prestige of doctoral program, mentoring, and prestige of current institution of employment were studied as these indicators represent major correlates with research productivity.

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Murray F. Mitchell

The purpose of this study was to determine why and how a sample of physical education teacher education (PETE) scholars manage to be productive publishers. Authors or coauthors of four or more articles in the Journal of Teaching in Physical Education (JTPE) through the 1980s (N = 24) responded to a mail questionnaire on why they write, why they choose to write for JTPE, what they believe to be true about themselves or their approach to writing, and any situational factors that have led to their publication success. Authors described personal motives such as publishing to meet a curiosity drive, for the enjoyment of the process, to facilitate learning, and to lead toward promotion and raises. Facilitators of the process included having access to colleagues and mentors and having a personal commitment to pursue publication. These findings are discussed with regard to insights available for administrators and novice faculty members.