Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author: Nalini Ranjit x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Leigh Ann Ganzar, Nalini Ranjit, Debra Saxton and Deanna M. Hoelscher

Background: Few studies have examined school physical activity policies to assess dose–response on student outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between health-promoting physical activity policies in elementary schools and physical activity behavior. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, physical activity was assessed using self-report measures in fourth-grade students in Texas (N = 1958, x = 9.66 y) from the School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) survey. School policies were assessed using the number of health-promoting policies in place taken from the SPAN School Health Survey with principals and their proxies. Multiple linear regressions adjusted for student- and school-level confounders and school clustering were performed. Results: School physical activity policies were significantly associated with student-level physical activity behavior (P < .05), even after controlling for the student- and school-level confounding variables. The interactions between physical activity policy-by-economic disadvantage (P < .01) and between physical activity policy-by-geographic strata (P < .01) were both significant, with stronger direct effects of policies on student physical activity for economically disadvantaged schools and major urban schools. Conclusion: Results from this study provide evidence for the importance of school-based health policies and practices in potentially reducing health disparities, especially in low-income and urban schools.

Restricted access

Eileen K. Nehme, Adriana Pérez, Nalini Ranjit, Benjamin C. Amick III and Harold W. Kohl III

Background:

Transportation bicycling is a behavior with demonstrated health benefits. Population-representative studies of transportation bicycling in United States are lacking. This study examined associations between sociodemographic factors, population density, and transportation bicycling and described transportation bicyclists by trip purposes, using a US-representative sample.

Methods:

This cross-sectional study used 2009 National Household Travel Survey datasets. Associations among study variables were assessed using weighted multivariable logistic regression.

Results:

On a typical day in 2009, 1% of Americans older than 5 years of age reported a transportation bicycling trip. Transportation cycling was inversely associated with age and directly with being male, with being white, and with population density (≥ 10,000 vs < 500 people/square mile: odd ratio, 2.78, 95% confidence interval, 1.54–5.05). Those whose highest level of education was a high school diploma or some college were least likely to bicycle for transportation. Twenty-one percent of transportation bicyclists reported trips to work, whereas 67% reported trips to social or other activities.

Conclusions:

Transportation bicycling in the United States is associated with sociodemographic characteristics and population density. Bicycles are used for a variety of trip purposes, which has implications for transportation bicycling research based on commuter data and for developing interventions to promote this behavior.

Restricted access

Andrew E. Springer, Steven H. Kelder, Nalini Ranjit, Heather Hochberg-Garrett, Sherman Crow and Joanne Delk

Background:

Marathon Kids® (MK) is a community and school-based program that promotes running, walking, and healthy eating in elementary school children. This study assessed the impact of MK on self-reported physical activity (PA), fruit and vegetable consumption (FVC), and related psycho-social factors in a sample of low-income, 4th- and 5th-grade students in Texas (n = 511). Intervention strategies included structured school running time, behavioral tracking, celebratory events, and rewards.

Methods:

A quasi-experimental design with 5 intervention (MK) and 3 comparison schools was employed. Students were assessed at baseline in the fall and at 3 time points during 2008 to 09. Mixed-effect regression methods were used to model pooled means, adjusting for baseline and sociodemographic variables.

Results:

MK students reported a higher mean time of running in past 7 days compared with non-MK students (mean = 4.38 vs. 3.83, respectively. P = .002), with a standardized effect size of 0.16. Mean times of FVC (P = .008), athletic identity self-concept (P < .001), PA outcome expectations (P = .007), and PA and FVC self-efficacy (P < .001 and P = .02, respectively) were also higher in MK students. Fewer differences in social support were observed.

Conclusion:

Findings provide further evidence on the importance of community and school partnerships for promoting PA and healthy eating in children.

Restricted access

Eileen K. Nehme, Adriana Pérez, Nalini Ranjit, Benjamin C. Amick III and Harold W. Kohl III

Background:

This quasi-experimental study assessed the effects of new workplace showers on physical activity behaviors in a sample of downtown employees in Austin, TX.

Methods:

The study design was quasi-experimental with 2 comparison groups. Data were collected via internet-based surveys before and 4 months after shower installation at 1 worksite. Differences across study groups in the ranks of change in past-week minutes of physical activity from baseline to follow-up were assessed. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for reporting an increase of ≥10 min past-week physical activity and workday physical activity among those with new showers and existing showers relative to those with no showers were also assessed.

Results:

No significant differences in changes in physical activity from baseline to follow-up across study groups were found. One-quarter of participants with new workplace showers and 46.9% of those with existing workplace showers at baseline reported ever using the showers.

Conclusions:

This prospective study did not find significant changes in employee physical activity 4 months after installation of worksite showers. Worksite shower users were highly active at baseline, suggesting a possible early adopter effect, with potential for diffusion. Future studies may benefit from longer exposure times and larger samples.

Restricted access

Meliha Salahuddin, Eileen Nehme, Nalini Ranjit, Young-Jae Kim, Abiodun O. Oluyomi, Diane Dowdy, Chanam Lee, Marcia Ory and Deanna M. Hoelscher

Background:

The role of parents’ perceptions of the neighborhood environment in determining children’s active commuting to and from school (ACS) is understudied. This study examined the association between parents’ perceptions of neighborhood social cohesion, perceived neighborhood safety, and their children’s ACS.

Methods:

This cross-sectional analysis (n = 857 from 81 elementary schools in Texas) examined baseline data from the Texas Childhood Obesity Prevention Policy Evaluation project. Participants had a mean age of 9.6 (0.6) years, and 50% were girls. Mixed effects logistic regression models were used to assess gender-stratified associations between parent’s perceived social cohesion and children’s ACS and their perception of neighborhood safety.

Results:

A positive significant association was observed between levels of perceived social cohesion and children’s ACS for boys (P = 0.047); however, an inverse significant association was observed among girls (P = 0.033). Parents of boys living in neighborhoods with medium to high social cohesion were more likely to perceive their neighborhood as safe compared with parents living in neighborhoods with low social cohesion, though nonsignificant. Perceived neighborhood safety for walking and biking was associated with greater ACS among boys (P = 0.003).

Conclusions:

Our study findings indicate that both social and physical environments are important factors in determining ACS among boys.