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  • Author: Nicholas J. SantaBarbara x
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Sanaz Nosrat, James W. Whitworth, Nicholas J. SantaBarbara, Shira I. Dunsiger and Joseph T. Ciccolo

Depressive symptoms and fatigue are prevalent among people living with human immunodeficiency virus. Resistance exercise is known to stimulate a positive affective response. Objective: To examine the acute psychological effects of resistance-exercise intensity among Black/African-American people living with human immunodeficiency virus and experiencing depressive symptoms. Methods: A total of 42 participants were randomized into a moderate- (n = 21) or high-intensity (n = 21) group. Assessments were collected before exercise (PRE), at the midpoint (MID), immediately following (POST) exercise, and 15 (DELAY 15) and 30 (DELAY 30) min after. Results: In the moderate-intensity group, affect improved PRE to POST, PRE to DELAY 15 and DELAY 30, and perceived distress decreased from PRE to all time points. In the high-intensity group, affect declined PRE to MID, and perceived distress decreased PRE to DELAY 15 and DELAY 30. Perceived activation increased PRE to MID, and POST in both groups (ps < .01). Conclusions: The moderate-intensity group compared with the high-intensity group is more effective at improving affect and energy and at reducing distress.