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  • Author: Noreen L. Goggin x
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Noreen L. Goggin and James R. Morrow Jr.

The purpose of this study was to determine older adults’ physical activity behaviors and stage of readiness for physical activity. Data were collected on 403 American adults over the age of 60. Of these participants, 206 were aged 61–70 and 197 were over the age of 70. Participants first provided information regarding their perceptions of the benefits of physical activity. Then questions were asked to determine their stage of readiness for physical activity (i.e., precontemplation, contemplation, etc.). Results indicated that older adults are aware of the health benefits of physical activity (89%), but 69% of them are not participating in sufficient physical activity to obtain such benefits. Physical activity involvement decreases with increased age, and older men tend to be more physically active than older women. Increased knowledge about the benefits of physical activity and one’s stage of readiness for it might help increase the number of older adults who engage in sufficient physical activity.

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Harry J. Meeuwsen, Sinah L. Goode and Noreen L. Goggin

The purpose of this experiment was to replicate and extend earlier experiments used to investigate the effect of the motor response, experience with open skills, and gender on coincidence-anticipation timing accuracy. Fifteen males and fifteen females, who were all right-eye and right-hand dominant, performed a switch-press and a hitting coincident-anticipation timing task on a Bassin Anticipation Timing apparatus with stimulus speeds of 4 mph, 8 mph, and 12 mph. Level of experience with open skills was determined by a self-report questionnaire and vision was screened using the Biopter Vision Test. Experience with open skills explained some of the variable error data, possibly supporting a socio-cultural explanation of gender differences. Males performed with less variable and absolute error than females, while performance bias was different for the genders on the two tasks. All participants performed with less absolute error on the 8 mph stimulus speed. The type of task and stimulus speed affected performance variability differently. Based on the task characteristics and these data, it was concluded that optimal effector anticipation is more strongly linked to stimulus speed than receptor anticipation. Future studies will have to confirm this conclusion.

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Harry J. Meeuwsen, Sinah L. Goode and Noreen L. Goggin

Ten young and 10 older adult females, who were all right-eye and right-hand dominant, performed a switch-press and a hitting coincidence anticipation timing task on a Bassin Anticipation Timing apparatus with stimulus speeds of 4,8, and 12 mph. Level of experience with open skills was determined by a self-report questionnaire, and all participants were screened on six visual characteristics using the Biopter Vision Test. Unlike the young adults, older adults reported no substantial experience with open skills. Prior experience with open skills was found to have little effect on the different dependent variables. Nonetheless, young females performed with less absolute and variable error than older females. Our data suggest that older females’ perceptual and motor systems are differentially affected by manipulations of task and stimulus characteristics.