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Junpei Sasadai, Yukio Urabe, Noriaki Maeda, Hiroshi Shinohara and Eri Fujii

Context:

Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a common disorder in soccer players and ballet dancers. In soccer players, it is caused by the repetitive stress of ankle plantar flexion due to instep kicking. Protective ankle dorsiflexion taping is recommended with the belief that it prevents posterior ankle impingement. However, the relationship between ankle taping and ball-kicking performance remains unclear.

Objective:

To demonstrate the relationship between the restrictions of ankle taping and performance of an instep kick in soccer.

Design:

Laboratory-based repeated-measures.

Setting:

University laboratory.

Participants:

11 male university soccer players.

Intervention:

The subjects’ ankle plantar flexion was limited by taping. Four angles of planter flexion (0°, 15°, 30°, and without taping) were formed by gradation limitation. The subjects performed maximal instep kicks at each angle.

Main Outcome Measures:

The movements of the kicking legs and the ball were captured using 3 high-speed cameras at 200 Hz. The direct linear-transformation method was used to obtain 3-dimensional coordinates using a digitizing system. Passive ankle plantar-flexion angle, maximal plantar-flexion angle at ball impact, ball velocity, and foot velocity were measured. The data were compared among 4 conditions using repeated-measures ANOVA, and the correlations between ball velocity and foot velocity and between ball velocity and toe velocity were calculated.

Results:

Ankle dorsiflexion taping could gradually limit both passive plantar flexion and plantar flexion at the impact. Furthermore, limitation of 0° and 15° reduced the ball velocity generated by instep kicks.

Conclusion:

Plantar-flexion-limiting taping at 30° has a potential to prevent posterior ankle impingement without decreasing the ball velocity generated by soccer instep kicks.

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Noriaki Maeda, Yukio Urabe, Junpei Sasadai, Akira Miyamoto, Masahito Murakami and Junichi Kato

Context:

Whole-body-vibration (WBV) stimulus equipment has been used as a new training method for health promotion. Its use in the clinic has expanded to the field of sports and rehabilitation for disabled patients. WBV training is rapidly gaining popularity in health and fitness centers as an alternative method for improving muscle performance. Acute positive effects of WBV have been shown on lower-extremity muscle power and vertical-jump ability; however, there have not been any studies focusing on the long-term effects of WBV for trunk muscle and dynamic balance.

Objective:

To investigate the effects of an 8-wk program of WBV in combination with trunk-muscle training on muscle performance in healthy, untrained adults.

Design:

Laboratory-based, repeated-measures study.

Setting:

University laboratory.

Participants:

20 healthy university men.

Intervention:

Participants were randomly assigned to a WBV or non-WBV group. The WBV group performed a trunk-muscle-training program in combination with WBV; the non-WBV group performed the same muscle-training program without WBV for 8 wk.

Main Outcome Measures:

In the pre- and posttraining period, the participants were evaluated using the Functional Movement Screen (FMS), Y Balance Test (Y-test) (anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral reach), trunk-muscle isometric strength (flexor, extensor, and flexor:extensor ratio), squat jump, and countermovement jump.

Results:

The WBV group had greater improvement than the non-WBV group in both trunk-flexor muscle strength (P = .02) and the Y-test (anterior reach) (P = .004) between pre- and posttraining.

Conclusion:

Adding WBV to a trunk-muscle-strengthening program may improve trunk-flexor isometric strength and anterior reach during the Y-test more than training without WBV. The WBV protocol used in this study had no significant impact on FMS scores, squat jumping, countermovement jumping, trunk-extensor isometric strength, or trunk flexor:extensor ratio.