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  • Author: Norma S. Griffin x
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Norma S. Griffin and Michael E. Crawford

The purposes of this study were (a) to construct and validate a Stunt Movement Confidence Inventory (SMCI) that would reliably discriminate between high- and low-confidence children and (b) to examine perceived confidence in light of assumptions from the movement confidence model. Interaction of three components postulated in the model (competence, potentials for enjoyment, and harm) was studied by analyzing the response patterns of 356 children. Reliability coefficients for item, subscale, total scale, and subject stability ranged from r=.79 to .93. SMCI subscales successfully classified 88% of all subjects with a 52.3% improvement over chance and a validity coefficient of .98. The factor matrix accounted for 49% of the total variance and verified the dominance of the competence subscale and the multivariate nature of the harm variable (subscale). Response profiles of low- and high-confidence groups validated the identity and separability of the model's theoretical components—competence, enjoyment, and harm. The SMCI was reliable and valid in discriminating between high- and low-confidence children.

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Norma S. Griffin, Jack F. Keogh and Richard Maybee

The initial study of movement confidence as a construct attempted to answer the research questions of whether confidence is more than competence and whether the determinants of confidence vary in relation to the movement situation. The study was designed as a preliminary examination of these two concerns in terms of the three components-competence, potential for enjoying moving sensations, and potential for harm—which were proposed in the model for movement confidence. Factor and regression analyses of data from 352 college students indicated that movement confidence is more than competence, and the determinants of movement confidence seem to vary in relation to movement situations and possibly in relation to gender. The major contribution of perceived level of confidence generally is a personal feeling of competence. The precise contributions of additional modifiers cannot be specified at present.