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Barrie Gordon, Jenn M. Jacobs and Paul M. Wright

This study examined a long-term afterschool leadership program situated in a Midwestern university town in the US. The activity-based program for boys considered to be disengaged with school and at risk for dropping out of education, was based on the Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility (TPSR) model. The program curriculum was strongly aligned with the social and emotional learning (SEL) theoretical framework. The study sought to identify the learning(s) that occurred and the impact of participation for participants. The key findings were that 1) the pedagogical approach and strategies of TPSR when implemented with a high level of fidelity align strongly with the SEL framework; 2) the structure and design of this TPSR based program was an important ingredient in the school’s overall approach to supporting SEL among students, and 3) a number of SEL outcomes were identified as a result of participation in this program.

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Peter W. Grandjean, Burritt W. Hess, Nicholas Schwedock, Jackson O. Griggs and Paul M. Gordon

Kinesiology programs are well positioned to create and develop partnerships within the university, with local health care providers, and with the community to integrate and enhance the activities of professional training, community service, public health outreach, and collaborative research. Partnerships with medical and health care organizations may be structured to fulfill accreditation standards and the objectives of the “Exercise is Medicine®” initiative to improve public health through primary prevention. Barriers of scale, location, time, human resources, and funding can be overcome so all stakeholder benefits are much greater than the costs.

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Joshua Lowndes, Robert F. Zoeller, George A. Kyriazis, Mary P. Miles, Richard L. Seip, Niall M. Moyna, Paul S. Visich, Linda S. Pescatello, Paul M. Gordon, Paul D. Thompson and Theodore J. Angelopoulos

The purpose of this study was to examine whether leptin levels affect the response of leptin to exercise training (ET) and whether this is also affected by C-reactive protein (CRP) or the three common Apolipoprotein E genotypes (APOE). Ninety-seven (male = 45, female = 52) sedentary individuals underwent 6 months of supervised ET. Blood was sampled before the initiation of ET, and again 24 and 72 hr after completion of the final training session. ET resulted in a small reduction in body mass (80.47 ± 18.03 vs 79.42 ± 17.34 kg, p < .01). Leptin was reduced 24 hr after the final exercise session (p < .01), but returned to normal after 72 hr (p > .05)—Pre: 13.51 ± 12.27, 24hr: 12.14 ± 12.34, 72hr: 12.98 ± 11.40 ng/ml. The most hyperleptinemic individuals had a greater initial response, which was sustained through to 72 hr after the final session in the pooled study population (p < .01), and in both males (p < .05) and females (p < .05) separately. CRP was related to leptin independently of body weight and positively related to the reductions in leptin. APOE genotype was not related to leptin levels and did not affect the response to ET. Leptin levels may only be reduced by ET in those with hyperleptinemia. In addition, both the initial extent of hyperleptinemia and the subsequent reduction in leptin may be related to low grade chronic systemic inflammation.