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Martin Watson, Daniele Bibbo, Charles R. Duffy, Philip E. Riches, Silvia Conforto and Andrea Macaluso

In a laboratory setting where both a mechanically-braked cycling ergometer and a motion analysis (MA) system are available, flywheel angular displacement can be estimated by using MA. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the validity and reliability of a MA method for measuring maximal power output (Pmax) in comparison with a force transducer (FT) method. Eight males and eight females undertook three identical sessions, separated by 4 to 6 days; the first being a familiarization session. Individuals performed three 6-second sprints against 50% of the maximal resistance to complete two pedal revolutions with a 3-minute rest between trials. Power was determined independently using both MA and FT analyses. Validity: MA recorded significantly higher Pmax than FT (P < .05). Bland–Altman plots showed that there was a systematic bias in the difference between the measures of the two systems. This difference increased as power increased. Repeatability: Intraclass correlation coefficients were on average 0.90 ± 0.05 in males and 0.85 ± 0.08 in females. Measuring Pmax by MA, therefore, is as appropriate for use in exercise physiology research as Pmax measured by FT, provided that a bias between these measurements methods is allowed for.

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Dimitrios-Sokratis Komaris, Cheral Govind, Andrew Murphy, Alistair Ewen and Philip Riches

Patients with osteoarthritis of the knee commonly alter their movement to compensate for lower limb weakness and alleviate joint pain. Movement alterations may lead to weight-bearing asymmetries, and potentially to the progression of the disease. This study presents a novel numerical procedure for the identification of sit-to-walk strategies and differences in movement habits between control adults and persons with knee osteoarthritis. Ten control and 12 participants with osteoarthritis performed the sit-to-walk task in a motion capture laboratory. Participants sat on a stool with the height adjusted to 100% of their knee height, then stood and walked to pick up an object from a table in front of them. Different movement strategies were identified by means of hierarchical clustering. Trials were also classified as to whether the left and right extremities used a bilateral or an asymmetrical strategy. Participants with osteoarthritis used significantly more asymmetrical arm strategies (P = .03) while adopting the pushing through the chair strategy more often than the control subjects (P = .02). The results demonstrated that the 2 groups favor different sit-to-walk strategies. Asymmetrical arm behavior possibly indicates a compensation for the weakness of the affected leg. The proposed procedure may be useful to rapidly assess postoperative outcomes and developing rehabilitation strategies.