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Wang Jiahong, Ping Xiang, Zhang Dazhi, Weidong Liu and Xiaofeng Gao

Physical education (PE) undergraduate programs in higher education in China have evolved over the last 100 years. As a result, a comprehensive system of physical education undergraduate majors in higher education has been established in today’s colleges/universities in China. The large number of students who have completed a physical education undergraduate major have greatly contributed to the development of physical education and sports in China. In this article, we reviewed the evolution of physical education undergraduate majors in higher education in China according to five historical eras: (a) the early period of New China, (b) the Cultural Revolution period, (c) the early period of reform and opening up, (d) the period of socialist market economy exploration, and (e) the 21st century era. We also systematically examine the structures, goals, and courses of the physical education undergraduate majors in higher education in China. Finally, we provide in-depth analysis of the development of the physical education undergraduate majors through the examination of their guiding principles, goals, and curriculum design, which might serve as a reference for further enhancing the reform of the curricular design of the physical education undergraduate majors in higher education during the current era.

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Ying Sun, Jing An, Xi Wang, Ping Zu and Fang-Biao Tao

Background:

The study aims to understand the possible gender difference in the associations between physical activity and depressive symptoms during pubertal transition.

Methods:

Participants were 30,399 children and adolescents of Han ethnicity from urban and rural areas in 8 cities in China. Physical activity (PA) and depressive symptom was assessed by adapted Youth Risk Behavior Survey and Children Depression Inventory (CDI), respectively. Pubertal development was assessed by trained physicians.

Results:

In China, over 30% boys and 40% girls reported having no vigorous PA (VPA) or moderate PA (MPA) in the past week. In girls, participating in VPA 1 to 2 days/week showed protective effect for depressive symptoms; whereas in boys, participating in MPA 1 to 2 days/week showed protective effect for depressive symptoms at and after genital stage III (G3).

Conclusions:

Moderate frequency (1 to 2 days/week) in PA undertaken might be encouraged to prevent depressive symptoms among adolescents.

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Yang Liu, Yan Tang, Zhen-Bo Cao, Jie Zhuang, Zheng Zhu, Xue-Ping Wu, Li-Juan Wang, Yu-Jun Cai, Jia-Lin Zhang and Pei-Jie Chen

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Andrew M. Holwerda, Freek G. Bouwman, Miranda Nabben, Ping Wang, Janneau van Kranenburg, Annemie P. Gijsen, Jatin G. Burniston, Edwin C.M. Mariman and Luc J.C. van Loon

Physical activity increases muscle protein synthesis rates. However, the impact of exercise on the coordinated up- and/or downregulation of individual protein synthesis rates in skeletal muscle tissue remains unclear. The authors assessed the impact of exercise on mixed muscle, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein synthesis rates as well as individual protein synthesis rates in vivo in rats. Adult Lewis rats either remained sedentary (n = 3) or had access to a running wheel (n = 3) for the last 2 weeks of a 3-week experimental period. Deuterated water was injected and subsequently administered in drinking water over the experimental period. Blood and soleus muscle were collected and used to assess bulk mixed muscle, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein synthesis rates using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and individual muscle protein synthesis rates using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (i.e., dynamic proteomic profiling). Wheel running resulted in greater myofibrillar (3.94 ± 0.26 vs. 3.03 ± 0.15%/day; p < .01) and mitochondrial (4.64 ± 0.24 vs. 3.97 ± 0.26%/day; p < .05), but not mixed muscle (2.64 ± 0.96 vs. 2.38 ± 0.62%/day; p = .71) protein synthesis rates, when compared with the sedentary condition. Exercise impacted the synthesis rates of 80 proteins, with the difference from the sedentary condition ranging between −64% and +420%. Significantly greater synthesis rates were detected for F1-ATP synthase, ATP synthase subunit alpha, hemoglobin, myosin light chain-6, and synaptopodin-2 (p < .05). The skeletal muscle protein adaptive response to endurance-type exercise involves upregulation of mitochondrial protein synthesis rates, but it is highly coordinated as reflected by the up- and downregulation of various individual proteins across different bulk subcellular protein fractions.