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  • Author: Polemnia G. Amazeen x
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Suvobrata Mitra, Polemnia G. Amazeen and Michael T. Turvey

We investigated the 1:1 frequency locking of two hand-held pendulums oscillated parallel to the body's coronal plane. In this configuration, anti-phase defined muscularly is in-phase defined spatially, and vice versa. Coordination equilibria measured by average relative phase were shifted less from muscular anti-phase than from muscular in-phase by detuning (unequal uncoupled pendulum frequencies) and were shifted less in both modes with vision than without. Variability of the equilibria, however, was ordered opposite to their degrees of shift and was unaffected by vision. Demonstrated subcritical pitchfork and tangent bifurcations conformed to the variability classification of anti- and in-phase coordination. Implications for dynamical models, hierarchical control, and definitions of coordination modes were discussed.

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Cameron T. Gibbons, Polemnia G. Amazeen and Aaron D. Likens

The common practice of standardizing foot placement in postural research and in clinical practice may serve to increase postural sway. The focus of this study was to investigate foot placement strategies in the tandem (anteroposterior, AP) and side-to-side (mediolateral, ML) stance in healthy adults. Foot placement was either experimenter-controlled or selected by the participant. Greater sway was observed for the AP stance than the ML stance, where sway was minimal. When foot placement was self-selected, participants recruited additional degrees of freedom by rotating both feet outward to expand the base of support; they narrowed their stance width in the AP stance only. Self-selection served to decrease AP sway for the AP stance and increase ML sway for both the AP and ML stances. A dynamical measure, the largest Lyapunov exponent, supported the finding that self-selection of foot placement serves to stabilize posture. The implication is that improvements in postural control were due primarily to self-selection of foot placement and not to adjustments in stance width. Experimental and perhaps clinical procedures should be revised to allow participants to self-select foot placement during postural tasks.

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Cameron T. Gibbons, Polemnia G. Amazeen and Aaron D. Likens

Variability is commonly observed in complex behavior, such as the maintenance of upright posture. The current study examines the value added by using nonlinear measures of variability to identify dynamic stability instead of linear measures that reflect average fluctuations about a mean state. The largest Lyapunov exponent (λ1) and SD were calculated on mediolateral movement as participants performed a sit-to-stand task on a stable and unstable platform. Both measures identified changes in movement across postures, but results diverged when participants stood on the unstable platform. Large SD indicated an increase in movement variability, but small λ1 identified those movements as stable and controlled. The results suggest that a combination of linear and nonlinear analyses is useful in identifying the proportion of observed variability that may be attributed to structured, controlled sources. Nonlinear measures of variability, like λ1, can further be used to make predictions about transitions between stable postures and to identify a system’s resistance to disruption from external perturbations. Those features make nonlinear analyses highly applicable to both human movement research and clinical practice.

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Michael A. Riley, Eric L. Amazeen, Polemnia G. Amazeen, Paul J. Treffner and Michael T. Turvey

Handedness and attentional asymmetries in bimanual rhythmic coordination were examined as a function of movement speed. In an in-phase 1:1 frequency locking task, left-handed and right-handed subjects controlled the oscillations of either the right or the left hand so as to contact spatial targets. The task was performed at three frequencies of coupled movement. Coordination dynamics incorporating the body's functional asymmetry predicted that left-handers and right-handers would deviate from zero relative phase in opposite directions, that the deviation would be greater for preferred-hand targeting, and that this deviation would be greater at higher movement frequencies. The results confirmed the major predictions and suggested that asymmetry due to handedness is magnified by attention.