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  • Author: Priscilla M. Clarkson x
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Priscilla M. Clarkson

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Edited by Priscilla M. Clarkson

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Priscilla M. Clarkson

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Edited by Priscilla M. Clarkson

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Edited by Priscilla M. Clarkson

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Edited by Priscilla M. Clarkson

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Priscilla M. Clarkson

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Priscilla M. Clarkson

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Edited by Priscilla M. Clarkson

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Kazunori Nosaka and Priscilla M. Clarkson

This study was done to determine whether eccentric exercise that causes muscle damage will produce an increase in plasma levels of zinc. Changes in total plasma zinc concentration (Zn) were examined following an eccentric and concentric exercise of the forearm flexors. Eight female subjects performed 24 maximal concentric actions (CON) with one arm and 10-14 days later performed 24 maximal eccentric actions (ECC) with the other arm. Maximal isometric force, elbow joint angles at a relaxed (RANG) and flexed position (FANG), muscle soreness, and plasma creatine kinase activity (CK) were measured as indicators of muscle damage. Zn levels were determined at the same time as CK. Maximal isometric force, RANG, FANG, and muscle soreness showed large changes after ECC but little if any change after CON. CK increased significantly after ECC but did not change after CON. Neither ECC nor CON showed significant changes in Zn following exercise. If: is concluded that exercise-induced muscle damage does not appear to produce an increase in plasma zinc levels.