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Missing Data Reporting and Analysis in Motor Learning and Development: A Systematic Review of Past and Present Practices

Priya Patel, Seungmin Lee, Nicholas D. Myers, and Mei-Hua Lee

Missing data incidents are common in experimental studies of motor learning and development. Inadequate handling of missing data may lead to serious problems, such as addition of bias, reduction in power, and so on. Thus, this study aimed to conduct a systematic review of the past (2007) and present (2017) practices used for reporting and analyzing missing data in motor learning and development. For this purpose, the authors reviewed 309 articles from five journals focusing on motor learning and development studies and published in 2007 and 2017. The authors carefully reviewed each article using a six-stage review process to assess the reporting and analyzing practices. Reporting of missing data along with reasons for their presence was consistently high across time, which slightly increased in 2017. Researchers predominantly used older methods (mainly deletion) for analysis, which only showed a small increase in the use of newer methods in 2017. While reporting practices were exemplary, missing data analysis calls for serious attention. Improvements in missing data handling may have the merit to address some of the major issues, such as underpowered studies, in motor learning and development.

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Influence of Chronic Ankle Instability on Physical Activity: A Critically Appraised Topic

Priya Patel, Luke Donovan, Tricia Hubbard-Turner, and Abbey C. Thomas

Lateral ankle sprains are the most common injury sustained by physically active individuals. The overwhelming majority of people who sprain their ankle go on to develop chronic ankle instability (CAI). CAI may cause affected individuals to limit their physical activity, leading to health issues such as obesity and cardiovascular disease. The growing body of literature suggests that functional limitations reported by individuals with CAI may lead a the decrease in physical activity. This critically appraised topic sought to determine if adolescent and college-aged individuals with CAI have lower physical activity levels than their healthy peers. A literature search was conducted in between August 2021–February 2022 using the terms “chronic ankle instability” and “physical activity.” Studies were included if the participants were adolescent or college-aged and had CAI. Three studies meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. The first study reported that college students with CAI walk fewer steps per week than their healthy peers, while the second study observed higher physical activity levels among adolescents with CAI. The third study incorporated details on how there is a high prevalence of ankle injury in adolescents, so methods to prevent the injury should be followed to avoid injury earlier on. Despite the conflicting evidence on how CAI impacts physical activity levels, physical activity remains important for long-term health. Thus, it is necessary to emphasize that individuals with CAI should seek treatment to mitigate recurrent ankle sprains in order to safely continue with physical activity.

Open access

Changes in Pediatric Movement Behaviors During the COVID-19 Pandemic by Stages of Lockdown in Ontario, Canada: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

Priya Patel, Xuedi Li, Charles D.G. Keown-Stoneman, Leigh M. Vanderloo, Laura M. Kinlin, Jonathon L. Maguire, and Catherine S. Birken

Background: Children’s movement behaviors have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic; however, little is known regarding movement behavior patterns over time by government-issued lockdowns. Our primary objective was to evaluate how children’s movement behaviors changed by stages of lockdown/reopening in Ontario, Canada, from 2020 to 2021. Methods: A longitudinal cohort study with repeated measures of exposure and outcomes was conducted. The exposure variables were dates from before and during COVID-19 when child movement behavior questionnaires were completed. Lockdown/reopening dates were included as knot locations in the spline model. The outcomes were daily screen, physical activity, outdoor, and sleep time. Results: A total of 589 children with 4805 observations were included (53.1% boys, 5.9 [2.6] y). On average, screen time increased during the first and second lockdowns and decreased during the second reopening. Physical activity and outdoor time increased during the first lockdown, decreased during the first reopening, and increased during the second reopening. Younger children (<5 y) had greater increases in screen time and lower increases in physical activity and outdoor time than older children (≥5 y). Conclusions: Policy makers should consider the impact of lockdowns on child movement behaviors, especially in younger children.