Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author: Rômulo A. Fernandes x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Bruna C. Turi, Jamile S. Codogno, Romulo A. Fernandes, Xuemei Sui, Carl J. Lavie, Steven N. Blair and Henrique L. Monteiro

Background:

Evidence has shown that physical activity (PA) is associated with low mortality risk. However, data about reduced mortality due to PA are scarce in developing countries and the dose–response relationship between PA from different domains and all-cause mortality remains unclear. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate the association of PA from different domains on all-cause mortality among Brazilian adults.

Methods:

679 males and females composed the study sample. Participants were divided into quartile groups according to PA from different domains (occupational, sports, and leisure-time). Medical records were used to identify the cause of the death. Cox regression analysis was performed to determine the independent associations of PA from different domains and all-cause mortality.

Results:

During the follow-up period, 59 participants died. The most prevalent cause of death was circulatory system diseases (n = 20; 33.9% [21.8%–45.9%]). Higher scores of occupational (HR= 0.45 [95% CI: 0.20–0.97]), sports (HR= 0.44 [95% CI: 0.20–0.95]) and overall PA (HR= 0.40 [95% CI: 0.17–0.90]) were associated with lower mortality, even after adjustment for confounders.

Conclusions:

The findings in this study showed the importance of being active in different domains to reduce mortality risk.

Restricted access

Bruna Camilo Turi, Jamile S. Codogno, Romulo A. Fernandes, Xuemei Sui, Carl J. Lavie, Steven N. Blair and Henrique Luiz Monteiro

Background:

Hypertension is one of the most common noncommunicable diseases worldwide, and physical inactivity is a risk factor predisposing to its occurrence and complications. However, it is still unclear the association between physical inactivity domains and hypertension, especially in public healthcare systems. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the association between physical inactivity aggregation in different domains and prevalence of hypertension among users of Brazilian public health system.

Methods:

963 participants composed the sample. Subjects were divided into quartiles groups according to 3 different domains of physical activity (occupational; physical exercises; and leisure-time and transportation). Hypertension was based on physician diagnosis.

Results:

Physical inactivity in occupational domain was significantly associated with higher prevalence of hypertension (OR = 1.52 [1.05 to 2.21]). The same pattern occurred for physical inactivity in leisure-time (OR = 1.63 [1.11 to 2.39]) and aggregation of physical inactivity in 3 domains (OR = 2.46 [1.14 to 5.32]). However, the multivariate-adjusted model showed significant association between hypertension and physical inactivity in 3 domains (OR = 2.57 [1.14 to 5.79]).

Conclusions:

The results suggest an unequal prevalence of hypertension according to physical inactivity across different domains and increasing the promotion of physical activity in the healthcare system is needed.

Restricted access

Ítalo R. Lemes, Rômulo A. Fernandes, Bruna C. Turi-Lynch, Jamile S. Codogno, Luana C. de Morais, Kelly A.K. Koyama and Henrique L. Monteiro

Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a combination of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of MetS worldwide is increasing. There is no study investigating the economic burden of MetS, especially in developing countries, on medication-related expenditure. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of medication-related expenditures with MetS and to explore how physical activity (PA) may influence this association. Methods: A total of 620 participants, 50 years or older, randomly selected in the city of Bauru, Brazil. Participants were followed from 2010 to 2014, and data on health care expenditure were collected annually. PA questionnaire was applied at baseline, 2 (2012), and 4 (2014) years later. Results: Mean age was 64.7 (95% confidence interval, 64.1–65.3). MetS was associated with higher medication expenditure related to diseases of the circulatory (P <.01) and endocrine (P <.01) systems. MetS explained 17.2% of medication-related expenditures, whereas PA slightly attenuated this association, explaining 1.1% of all health care costs. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that MetS has a significant burden on health care expenditures among adults, whereas PA seems to affect this phenomenon significantly, but in low magnitude.

Restricted access

Kyle R. Lynch, Michael Fredericson, Bruna Turi-Lynch, Ricardo R. Agostinete, Igor H. Ito, Rafael Luiz-de-Marco, Mario A. Rodrigues-Junior and Rômulo A. Fernandes

Objectives: To investigate the effects of different sports on the incidence of traumatic fractures (TF; sport-related fractures and those occurring in daily activities) among adolescents during the 9-month follow-up period. Methods: The adolescents were contacted in 11 different locations (3 public/private schools and 8 sports clubs), and the final sample was divided into 3 groups: control (n = 121), swimming (n = 51), and impact sports (n = 142). The incidence of TF was calculated by considering the exposure to sports (TF/1000 h). Results: In the overall sample, the incidence of TF was 1.29 TF/1000 hours of sports exposure, while the incidence of sport-related TF was 0.39 TF/1000 hours of sports exposure. Adolescents engaged in sports (P = .004), independently of type (P = .001), for 3 or more days per week (P = .004) and more than 60 minutes per day (P = .001) had lower incidence of TF. Adolescents engaged in more than 300 minutes per week of sport (0.17 TF/1000 h) had lower incidence than those who did not (2.06 TF/1000 h [P = .001]). A similar finding was observed for sport-related TF (≥300 min/wk: 0.08 TF/1000 h vs 300 min/wk: 0.615 TF/1000 h [P = .02]). Conclusion: Adolescents engaged in sports showed a lower incidence of TF than nonengaged adolescents.

Restricted access

Igor H. Ito, Han C.G. Kemper, Ricardo R. Agostinete, Kyle R. Lynch, Diego G.D. Christofaro, Enio R. Ronque and Rômulo A. Fernandes

Purpose: To compare bone mineral density (BMD) gains in adolescents of both genders stratified according to different martial art styles in a 9-month follow-up study. Methods: The longitudinal study consisted of 29 adolescents of both genders and age between 11 and 17 years stratified into a control group (not engaged in any sport) and 50 fighters (kung fu/karate, n = 29; judo, n = 21). All 79 subjects underwent anthropometric measures (weight, height, leg length, and height set) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (BMD, in g/cm2) at 2 moments, baseline and 9 months later. Maturity offset (age at peak height velocity), lean soft tissue, chronological age, and resistance training were treated as covariates. Results: Male judoists presented higher gains in BMD-spine [0.098 g/cm2 (95% confidence interval, 0.068–0.128)] than control group [0.040 g/cm2 (95% confidence interval, 0.011–0.069)] (post hoc test with P = .030). There was no effect of martial art on BMD gains among girls. Independently of gender, in all multivariate models, lean soft tissue constituted the most relevant covariate. Conclusions: Judo practice in adolescents affected the bone accrual significantly after 9-month follow-up compared with controls, mainly in boys.

Restricted access

Diego G.D. Christofaro, Bruna C. Turi-Lynch, Kyle R. Lynch, William R. Tebar, Rômulo A. Fernandes, Fernanda G. Tebar, Gregore I. Mielke and Xuemei Sui

Background: This study investigated associations between different types of sedentary behavior (SB) and physical activity (PA) in parent and their child, including the moderating effects of parent and child sex. Methods: In total, 1231 adolescents, 1202 mothers, and 871 fathers were evaluated. The SB (TV viewing + computer + video game); different types of PA (leisure-time PA, occupational PA, and total PA); and the socioeconomic level were evaluated by questionnaire. The relationship between adolescents’ SB and PA with parental characteristics was estimated by linear regression. Results: The SB of male adolescents was correlated to the father’s SB (β = 0.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.13–0.39) and mother’s SB (β = 0.18; 95% CI, 0.06–0.31). A similar relationship was observed between SB of female adolescents and the father’s SB (β = 0.31; 95% CI, 0.19–0.42) and mother’s SB (β = 0.29; 95% CI, 0.20–0.38]). The SB of girls was inversely related to mother’s occupational PA (β = −2.62; 95% CI, −3.66 to −0.53]). The PA of the boys and girls was correlated with their fathers and mothers PA. All the results were adjusted for age and parent’s socioeconomic level. Conclusions: SB and PA of parents were associated with SB and PA of their children, regardless of gender. Strategies for health promotion should consider the family environment to increase PA and reduce SB.

Restricted access

André O. Werneck, Adewale L. Oyeyemi, Rômulo A. Fernandes, Marcelo Romanzini, Enio R.V. Ronque, Edilson S. Cyrino, Luís B. Sardinha and Danilo R. Silva

Background: This study aims to describe the regional prevalence and patterns of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior among Brazilian adolescents. Methods: Data from the Brazilian Scholar Health Survey, a nationally representative survey of ninth-grade adolescents [mean age: 14.29 y (14.27–14.29)] conducted in 2015 (n = 101,445), were used. Outcomes were television viewing, sitting time (ST), total PA, and active traveling collected via self-administered questionnaire. Information on frequency of physical education classes and type of school was collected from the school’s director. Frequencies with 95% confidence intervals were used to determine the prevalence and patterns of outcomes. Results: Higher prevalence of PA (≥300 min/wk) and ST (>4 h/d) was found in Midwest (PA = 38.0%; ST = 44.5%), South (PA = 37.6%; ST = 50.1%), and Southeast (PA = 36.1%; ST = 49.3%) compared with Northeast (PA = 29.7%; ST = 36.9%) and North (PA = 34.4%; ST = 34.8%) regions of Brazil. ST was higher among adolescents from private schools (51.5%) than public schools (42.9%), whereas active traveling was greater among students of public schools than private schools (62.0% vs 34.4%). Most inequalities in outcomes between capital and interior cities were in the poorest regions. Conclusions: The results indicate that national plans targeting regional inequalities are needed to improve PA and to reduce sedentary behavior among Brazilian adolescents.