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Rachel L. Wright, Dan M. Wood and David V.B. James

The aims of the study were to investigate whether starting cadence had an effect on 10-s sprint-performance indices in friction-loaded cycle ergometry and to investigate the influence of method of power determination. In a counterbalanced order, 12 men and 12 women performed three 10-s sprints using a stationary (0 rev/min), moderate (60 rev/min), and high (120 rev/min) starting cadence Calculated performance indices were peak power, cadence at peak power, time to peak power, and work to peak power. When the uncorrected method of power determination was applied, there was a main effect for starting cadence in female participants for peak power (stationary 635 ± 183.7 W, moderate 615.4 ± 168.9 W and high 798.4 ± 120.1 W) and cadence at peak power (89.8 ± 2.3 rev/min, 87.9 ± 21.5 rev/min, and 113.1 ± 12.5 rev/min). For both the uncorrected and directly measured methods of power determination in men and women, there was a main effect for starting cadence for time to peak power and work to peak power. In women, for an uncorrected method of power determination, it can be concluded that starting cadence does affect peak power and cadence at peak power. This effect is, however, negated by a direct-measurement method of power determination. In men and women, for both uncorrected and directly measured methods o power determination, time to peak power and work to peak power were affected by starting cadence. Therefore, a higher-cadence start is unsuitable, particularly when sprint-performance indices are determined from an uncorrected method.

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Rachel L. Wright, Joseph W. Bevins, David Pratt, Catherine M. Sackley and Alan M. Wing

Asymmetry in weight-bearing is a common feature in poststroke hemiparesis and is related to temporal asymmetry during walking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an auditory cue for stepping in place on measures of temporal and weight-bearing asymmetry. A total of 10 community-dwelling adults (6 males and 4 females) with chronic poststroke hemiparesis performed 5 un-cued stepping trials and 5 stepping trials cued by an auditory metronome cue. A Vicon system was used to collect full body kinematic trajectories. Two force platforms were used to measure ground reaction forces. Step, swing, and stance times were used to calculate temporal symmetry ratios. Weight-bearing was assessed using the vertical component of the ground reaction force and center of mass–center of pressure separation at mid-stance. Weight-bearing asymmetry was significantly reduced during stepping with an auditory cue. Asymmetry values for step, swing, and stance times were also significantly reduced with auditory cueing. These findings show that auditory cueing when stepping in place produces immediate reductions in measures of temporal asymmetry and dynamic weight-bearing asymmetry.