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Wendy Yajun Huang, Stephen Heung-Sang Wong, Martin Chi-Sang Wong, Cindy Hui-Ping Sit, Raymond Kim-Wai Sum and Gang He

Background:

Hong Kong’s 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity (PA) for Children and Youth is the first evidence-based synthesis of various indicators related to individual behaviors that contribute to overall PA levels, settings and sources of influence, and strategies and investments in Hong Kong.

Methods:

Following a standardized protocol, currently best available data for Hong Kong youth were collated and evaluated by an expert consensus panel on 9 indicators (5 activity behaviors and 4 influences on these behaviors).

Results:

Less than half of the children and youth met the recommended PA level. As a result, a D grade was given for Overall PA levels. Organized Sport Participation and Active Transportation received grades of C- and B, respectively. Sedentary Behaviors and School scored a C grade. Community and the Built Environment scored a grade of B. Family Influence received as low a score as Overall PA (D). Active Play and Government were not graded due to incomplete data.

Conclusions:

PA levels are low and sedentary behaviors are high for children and youth in Hong Kong. Promising policies exist in schools and features of community and the built environment are favorable. Increasing family support should be emphasized for future PA promotion.

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Siu-Ming Choi, Raymond Kim-Wai Sum, Tristan Wallhead, Amy Sau-Ching Ha, Cindy Hui-Ping Sit, Deng-Yau Shy and Feng-Min Wei

Physical education teacher education is a time when preservice teachers can reinforce their physical literacy (PL). Professional coursework within the teacher preparation program should also develop their teaching efficacy. In this regard, the purpose of this study was to examine the predictive relationship between preservice physical education teachers’ perceived PL and teaching efficacy. The findings revealed that the PL dimension of self-expression and communication with others was the most significant predictor of teaching efficacy in developing content knowledge, applying scientific knowledge to teaching, teaching students with special needs, and using technology. Furthermore, preservice teachers’ knowledge and understanding of PL predicted their teaching efficacy in accommodating skill level differences within instruction. These predictive relationships suggest that preservice teachers’ PL influences their efficacy to enact effective teaching behaviors and should remain an ongoing priority of physical education teacher preparation programming suggested by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.