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  • Author: Renata Moraes Bielemann x
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Renata Moraes Bielemann, Virgílio Viana Ramires, Denise Petrucci Gigante, Pedro Curi Hallal and Bernardo Lessa Horta

Background:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between physical activity and triglyceride and HDLc levels in young male adults.

Methods:

We used information about males belonging 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort. Physical activity in 4 domains (leisure time, transportation, household, and occupation) was assessed by self-report in participants of the cohort at ages of 18 and 23 years. Subjects were active if reached the recommendation of 150 min/week of moderate to vigorous physical activity. At 23 years of age, blood sample was collected, and triglycerides and HDLc levels estimated. Multivariate linear and Poisson regression were used to adjust the estimates for confounders.

Results:

Males who were inactive at 18 and active at 23 years had 41% lower risk (β = 0.59; 95% confidence interval: 0.40; 0.89) for borderline-high triglycerides (≥ 150 mg/dL) as compared with those who were inactive at both follow-ups. No association was found between changes of physical activity and HDLc level. In cross-sectional analyses, greater HDLc levels were found in active subjects in 4 domains, whereas there was no difference in HDL levels according physical activity during leisure time.

Conclusion:

Becoming active from adolescence to early adulthood reduced the risk for high triglycerides. Current physical activity was associated with greater HDLc levels.

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Renata Moraes Bielemann, Andreia Morales Cascaes, Felipe Fossati Reichert, Marlos R. Domingues and Denise Petrucci Gigante

Background:

The aim of this study was to assess physical activity (PA) patterns (intensity and prevalence) in children according to demographic, socioeconomic, and familiar characteristics.

Methods:

In 2010, a cross-sectional study of 239 children aged 4–11 was conducted, in Pelotas, Southern Brazil. PA was measured by accelerometry and classified in different intensities. Insufficient physical activity was defined as less than 60 min/day of moderate-to-vigorous PA. Descriptive analyses of accelerometry-related variables were presented. Multivariate Poisson regression models were used to estimate the association between physical insufficient PA and covariates.

Results:

For both sexes, around 65% of the registered time was spent in sedentary activities and less than 20 min/day in vigorous activity. Age and economic status were inversely associated to PA in all categories of PA. Moderate and vigorous activities means were higher in boys than in girls. The prevalence of insufficient PA was 34.5% in girls and 19.5% in boys.

Conclusions:

We found important differences in physical activity patterns according to sex and economic status, as well as a significant decline in time spent in moderate-to-vigorous PA with increasing age. Understanding the relationship between these sociodemographic factors is important to tackle low levels of PA.

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Rafaela Costa Martins, Felipe Fossati Reichert, Renata Moraes Bielemann and Pedro C. Hallal

Background:

To evaluate the 1-year stability of objectively measured physical activity among young adults living in South Brazil, as well as assessing the influences of temperature, humidity and precipitation on physical activity.

Methods:

A longitudinal study was conducted over 12 consecutive months (October 2012 to September 2013). Sixteen participants (8 men) used GT3X+ accelerometers 1 week per month for the entire year. Climate variables were obtained from an official climate information provider.

Results:

Physical activity was remarkably stable over the year—the proportion of the day spent in moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) was around 5% in every month. Average temperature (ρ = –0.64; P = .007), humidity (ρ = –0.68; P = .004) and rain (ρ = –0.67; P = .004) were inversely correlated to MVPA in the Summer. Rain was also inversely correlated to MVPA in the Spring (ρ = –0.54; P = .03).

Conclusions:

Objectively measured physical activity was stable over a 1-year period. Climate variables consistently influenced physical activity practice in the Summer, but not in the other seasons.

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Rafaela Costa Martins, Luiza Isnardi Cardoso Ricardo, Gerfeson Mendonça, Daiana Lopes de Rosa, Letícia Lemos Ayres da Gama Bastos, Carolina de Vargas Nunes Coll and Renata Moraes Bielemann

Objective: To evaluate trends in physical activity and sedentary behavior simultaneity among Brazilian students from 2009 to 2015 and its association with independent variables. Methods: This study presents a panel of 3 cross-sectional studies carried out in 2009, 2012, and 2015 (Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde do Escolar—PeNSE). The population was comprised of ninth-grade public and private schools students from Brazilian capitals. Physical activity and sedentary behavior variables were combined to create the outcome of simultaneity of these risk factors. Results: A large proportion of students were simultaneously inactive and sedentary in the 3 surveys. However, it was possible to observe a downward trend (2009: 56.4%; 95% confidence interval, 55.7–57.1; 2012: 53.7%; 95% confidence interval, 53.0–54.4; 2015: 51.9%; 95% confidence interval, 51.2–52.7). In 2015, estimates of physical inactivity and sedentary behavior simultaneity were greater than 48% for 20 out of 27 of the Brazilian states. Significant declining trends were observed among mideast residents, females, nonwhite, and those attending private schools. Only around 5%–7% of the adolescents were both active and nonsedentary in the 3 surveys. Conclusion: Despite of a slight decreasing trend in the proportion of Brazilian students simultaneously inactive and sedentary throughout the period, the prevalence remained elevated across the surveys.