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Influence of Hypohydration on Intermittent Sprint Performance in the Heat

Neil S. Maxwell, Richard W.A. Mackenzie, and David Bishop

Purpose:

To examine the effect of hypohydration on physiological strain and intermittent sprint exercise performance in the heat (35.5 ± 0.6°C, 48.7 ± 3.4% relative humidity).

Methods:

Eight unacclimatized males (age 23.4 ± 6.2 y, height 1.78 ± 0.04 m, mass 76.8 ± 7.7 kg) undertook three trials, each over two days. On day 1, subjects performed 90 min of exercise/heat-induced dehydration on a cycle ergometer, before following one of three rehydration strategies. On day 2, subjects completed a 36-min cycling intermittent sprint test (IST) with a -0.62 ± 0.74% (euhydrated, EUH), -1.81 (0.99)% (hypohydrated1, HYPO1), or -3.88 ± 0.89% (hypohydrated2, HYPO2) body mass defcit.

Results:

No difference was observed in average total work (EUH, 3790 ± 556 kJ; HYPO1, 3785 ± 628 kJ; HYPO2, 3647 ± 339 kJ, P = 0.418), or average peak power (EUH, 1315 ± 129 W; HYPO1, 1304 ± 175 W; HYPO2, 1282 ± 128 W, P = 0.356) between conditions on day 2. Total work and peak power output in the sprint immediately following an intense repeated sprint bout during the IST were lower in the HYPO2 condition. Physiological strain index was greater in the HYPO2 vs. the EUH condition, but without changes in metabolic markers.

Conclusion:

A greater physiological strain was observed with the greatest degree of hypohydration; however, sprint performance only diminished in the most hypohydrated state near the end of the IST, following an intense bout of repeating sprinting.

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Neck Loads during Head-First Collisions in Ice Hockey: Experimental and Simulation Results

Richard P. Wells, Patrick J. Bishop, and Malcolm Stephens

Spinal cord trauma due to head-first collisions is not uncommon in vehicle accidents, shallow water diving, football, or ice hockey. Two approaches to evaluating potential protective devices for ice hockey are described: an evaluative tool based upon an anthropometric test dummy, and a computer simulation of axial head-first collisions. Helmets reduced the peak cervical spine loads during low velocity head-first collisions by up to 8%. It is shown that large thicknesses of appropriate padding are necessary to hold the cervical spine loads to noninjurious levels. A head-first impact of 3.0 m • sec−1 required padding deformations on the order of 94 mm to hold cervical spine loads below 2,000 N.

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Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Repetitive Sprint Performance and Body Composition in Competitive Swimmers

Pamela D. Grindstaff, Richard Kreider, Richard Bishop, Michael Wilson, Larry Wood, Cheri Alexander, and Anthony Almada

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Lactate–Sweat Relationships in Younger and Middle-Aged Men

James M. Green, Phil A. Bishop, Ian H. Muir, and Richard G. Lomax

Sweat lactate is at least partly derived from eccrine-gland metabolism. This study examined whether potential age-associated changes in sweat rate and skin blood flow influence sweat lactate. Six middle-aged (51.5 ± 3.8 years) and 6 younger (25.8 ± 1.5 years) men similar in VO2max, height, weight, percent body fat, and surface area completed constant-load (CON) cycling and interval-cycling (INT) trials. During each trial, sweat and blood were analyzed for lactate concentration at 15, 25, 35, 45, and 60 min. Sweat rates and estimated total lactate secretion were not significantly different (p > .05) between trials or groups. Blood-lactate concentrations were not significantly different between groups during CON but were significantly higher in younger men at 35 min and 45 min during INT. Sweat-lactate concentrations were not significantly different (p > .05) between groups during CON or INT. These results suggest that differences in eccrine-gland metabolism between young and middle-aged men are minimal.