Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author: Robert M. Nideffer x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Robert M. Nideffer

Restricted access

Robert M. Nideffer

This study examined the effects that varying subjects’ response sets on the Test of Attentional and Interpersonal Style (TAIS) had on predictive validity. Fifteen elite divers took the TAIS under two response conditions. Initially they answered the items without a specific set or comparison group in mind. The second time they were instructed to compare themselves with other elite divers. It was hypothesized that by telling divers who to compare themselves to and by providing them with a situation-specific response set, this would increase the correlations between performance and TAIS scores. The implications and consequences of response set manipulations are discussed.

Restricted access

Robert M. Nideffer

This article describes the development and provision of psychological services to the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Teams for 1984 and 1988. It highlights the special problems encountered when attempting to provide services to elite level coaches and athletes. Helping athletes cope with the pressures generated by international travel, politics, elite level competition, drugs, and money provide the sport psychologist with a tremendous challenge and a moral dilemma.

Restricted access

Robert M. Nideffer

Over the past 15 years the Test of Attentional and Interpersonal Style (TAIS) has become increasingly popular in the sport psychology area. More recently, investigators factor-analyzing the six TAIS attentional scales and the information processing scale have raised serious questions about the independence of these measures. Specifically, they have suggested that the six attentional scales measured by the TAIS can be collapsed into two scales, one reflecting scanning (BET, BIT, INFP) and one reflecting the focusing of attention (NAR, OET, OIT). All of the studies reported on can be shown to have methodological flaws and to have drawn inappropriate conclusions from their analyses. Evidence is provided in the paper demonstrating the independence of the TAIS scales. Suggestions are made for avoiding the methodological and interpretive problems that have permeated the literature.

Restricted access

Robert M. Nideffer, Peter DuFresne, David Nesvig and Dennis Selder

Applied sport psychology is a field that is still in search of a definition. This article examines some of the ethical issues involved in the provision of psychological services to athletes and coaches. Observations are made regarding the types of services that sport psychologists are offering. The need for the development of applied internship experiences is emphasized.