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  • Author: Rodrigo Fernández-Verdejo x
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Mauricio Castro-Sepulveda, Jorge Cancino, Rodrigo Fernández-Verdejo, Cristian Pérez-Luco, Sebastian Jannas-Vela, Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo, Juan Del Coso and Hermann Zbinden-Foncea

During exercise, the human body maintains optimal body temperature through thermoregulatory sweating, which implies the loss of water, sodium (Na+), and other electrolytes. Sweat rate and sweat Na+ concentration show high interindividual variability, even in individuals exercising under similar conditions. Testosterone and cortisol may regulate sweat Na+ loss by modifying the expression/activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. This has not been tested. As a first approximation, the authors aimed to determine whether basal serum concentrations of testosterone or cortisol, or the testosterone/cortisol ratio relate to sweat Na+ loss during exercise. A total of 22 male elite soccer players participated in the study. Testosterone and cortisol were measured in blood samples before exercise (basal). Sweat samples were collected during a training session, and sweat Na+ concentration was determined. The basal serum concentrations of testosterone and cortisol and their ratio were (mean [SD]) 13.6 (3.3) pg/ml, 228.9 (41.4) ng/ml, and 0.06 (0.02), respectively. During exercise, the rate of Na+ loss was related to cortisol (r = .43; p < .05) and to the testosterone/cortisol ratio (r = −.46; p < .01), independently of the sweating rate. The results suggest that cortisol and the testosterone/cortisol ratio may influence Na+ loss during exercise. It is unknown whether this regulation depends on the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.