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  • Author: Roseann M. Lyle x
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Kimberly M. White, Roseann M. Lyle, Michael G. Flynn, Dorothy Teegarden and Shawn S. Donkin

The purpose of this study was to test the effect of acute dairy calcium intake on exercise energy metabolism and endurance performance. Trained female runners completed two trials. Each trial consisted of a 90-min glycogen depletion run followed by a self-paced 10K time trial, conducted one hour after consumption of a high dairy (500 mg Ca+2) or low dairy (80 mg Ca+2) meal. During the 90-min run, blood samples and respiratory gases were collected. No treatment main effects of acute dairy intake were found for respiratory exchange ratio (RER), calculated fat oxidation, lactate, glycerol, or 10K time. Following this protocol, acute dairy calcium intake did not alter fat utilization or endurance performance in trained female runners.

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W. Daniel Schmidt, Gerald C. Hyner, Roseann M. Lyle, Donald Corrigan, Gerald Bottoms and Christopher L. Melby

This study examined resting metabolic rate (RMR) and thermic effect of a meal (TEM) among athletes who had participated in long-term anaerobic or aerobic exercise. Nine collegiate wrestlers were matched for age, weight, and fat-free weight with 9 collegiate swimmers. Preliminary testing included maximal oxygen consumption, maximal anaerobic capacity (MAnC) for both the arms and the legs, and percent body fat. On two separate occasions, RMR and TEM were measured using indirect calorimetry. VO2max was significantly higher in the swimmers while MAnC was significantly higher in the wrestlers for both the arms and the legs. RMR adjusted for fat-free weight was not significantly different between groups. The differences in total and percentage of TEM between the groups were not statistically significant, and there were no differences in baseline thyroid hormones. These data suggest that despite significant differences in VO2max and WAnT values following long-term aerobic and anaerobic exercise training, resting energy expenditure does not differ between these college athletes.

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Marianne S. Eagan, Roseann M. Lyle, George P. McCabe and Dorothy Teegarden

Background:

Assessing past activity in study populations is important in health-related research. This study examined intrasubject stability of a comprehensive, self-administered Historical Activity Questionnaire (HAQ) developed for women, age 18 to 30 y, participating in a larger (N = 153) intervention.

Methods:

Volunteers (n = 31) completed the HAQ at baseline and 6.5 months. Activity, (h/d) and metabolic equivalent (MET)-h/d, was divided into elementary, middle, high school, occupation, athletics, leisure, and exercise impact levels and loading.

Results:

(MET-h/d) cumulative, past activity test–retest was r = 0.76. Highest stability was in total athletic participation (r = 0.82), and impact 3 (r = 0.87). Loading test–retest was r = 0.51.

Conclusions:

The HAQ provides a moderately stable, user-friendly instrument for documenting past activity in young women, particularly for past athletic and high-impact activity recall. The addition of impact and loading activity makes this questionnaire unique, and provides a model for inclusion of these components in other activity questionnaires.

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Barbara Resnick, Marcia G. Ory, Kerrie Hora, Michael E. Rogers, Phillip Page, Jane N. Bolin, Roseann M. Lyle, Cody Sipe, Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko and Terry L. Bazzarre

The Exercise Assessment and Screening for You (EASY) is a tool developed to help older individuals, their health care providers, and exercise professionals identify different types of exercise and physical activity regimens that can be tailored to meet the existing health conditions, illnesses, or disabilities of older adults. The EASY tool includes 6 screening questions that were developed based on an expert roundtable and follow-up panel activities. The philosophy behind the EASY is that screening should be a dynamic process in which participants learn to appreciate the importance of engaging in regular exercise, attending to health changes, recognizing a full range of signs and symptoms that might indicate potentially harmful events, and becoming familiar with simple safety tips for initiating and progressively increasing physical activity patterns. Representing a paradigm shift from traditional screening approaches that focus on potential risks of exercising, this tool emphasizes the benefits of exercise and physical activity for all individuals.