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Ross H. Sanders

The purpose of this study was to investigate technique in the eggbeater kick and to identity factors contributing to height that can be maintained. The kinematics of the lower limbs of 12 players ranging in ability from novice to elite were quantified using three-dimensional videographic techniques. Mean height of the vertex of the head with respect to water level was used as the measure of performance. These heights ranged from 0.22 m to 0.42 m. The mean of the squared fool velocity (r = .85, p < .01), the percent contribution of the vertical and anteroposterior components of foot velocity (r = −.72 and r = .72, respectively, p < .05) were strongly related to height. There were also substantial contributions due to mediolateral motion by all players, but this was not statistically related to height. Pitch angles were generally small throughout the kick cycle. Elite players maximized me period of positive pitch by appropriate use of ankle dorsi-flexion and plantar-flexion and eversion and inversion. The foot orientadons and flow directions of the elite players suggested that effective technique involved sculling actions to utilize lift forces.

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Ross H. Sanders

The main purpose of this study was to develop a model for calculating forces produced by a swimmer’s hand, with the thumb adducted, accelerating in the direction of flow. The model included coefficients to account for the velocity and acceleration of the hand. These coefficients were designed to calculate forces in the direction opposite the motion (drag) and two components of lift orthogonal to the direction of motion. To determine the coefficients, three-dimensional forces acting on a resin cast of a swimmer’s hand were recorded while accelerating the hand from rest to 0.45 m · s−1 and 0.6 m · −1 in a towing tank. The hand orientation was varied throughout the entire range at 5° increments. Three-dimensional surfaces describing the magnitude of the coefficients as functions of pitch and sweepback angle were produced. It was found that acceleration coefficients as well as velocity coefficients are required for accurate modeling of the forces produced by the hand in swimming. The forces generated by the hand are greatest when pitch angles approach 90° due to the large contribution by the drag component. However, at pitch angles near 45° and sweepback angles near 45° and 135°, lift forces contribute substantially.

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Ross H. Sanders

This study was designed to investigate the effect of ability on technique in the forward somersault with half twist (Barani) and the forward somersault with one and one half twists (Rudi) on the trampoline. Eleven trampolinists ranging in ability from elite (national representative) to early intermediate (regional representative) were analyzed using three-dimensional analysis techniques. Cumulative twist angle, rate of twist, angle of tilt of the twist axis, chest rotation, hip angle, and hip lateral flexion angle were measured. Characteristics of the arm actions were also assessed using an internal frame of reference. To generate twist in the Baranis, trampolinists tilted the axis between 5° and 14°; the amount of tilt was inversely related to ability (p < .05). In the Rudis, subjects tilted the axis between 15° and 23° using more asymmetrical arm actions and larger and more rapid hip extensions, hip lateral flexions, and chest rotations than in the Baranis. The timing and magnitude of the actions differed among the subjects and were related to ability.

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Ross H. Sanders

A boost is a skill used in water polo to raise the body for the purpose of shooting for goal or passing, or defending against these. The purpose of this study was to investigate kinematic variables contributing to height achieved in a boost. The kinematics of the vertex, shoulders, and lower limbs of 16 players ranging in ability from novice to elite were quantified using three-dimensional videographic techniques. Maximum height of the vertex with respect to water level ranged from 0.50 m to 0.90 m. A multiple regression model comprising the squared maximum resultant foot speed, range of knee joint extension, and initial trunk angle with respect to the horizontal accounted for 74% of the variance in height achieved. Anteroposterior and medio-lateral motions assisted in maintaining foot speed throughout the period of knee extension. The foot orientations and direction of foot motion of the elite players suggested that effective technique involves the use of both drag and lift forces.

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Ross H. Sanders and Barry D. Wilson

This study investigated the in-flight rotation of elite 3m springboard divers by determining the angular momentum requirement about the transverse axis through the divers center of gravity (somersault axis) required to perform a forward 1 1/2 somersault with and without twist. Three elite male divers competing in the 1982 Commonwealth Games were filmed using high-speed cinematography while performing the forward 1 1/2 somersault in the pike position and the forward 1 1/2 somersault with one twist in a free position. The film was digitized to provide a kinematic description of each dive. An inclined axis technique appeared to be the predominant means of producing twist after takeoff from the board. The angular momentum about the somersault axis after takeoff was greater for the forward 1 1/2 somersault with twist than the forward 1 1/2 somersault without twist for all three divers. The difference in angular momentum between the two dives of each diver ranged from 6% to 19%. The most observable difference between the dives during the preflight phases was the degree of hip flexion at takeoff. There was more hip flexion at takeoff in 5132D than 103B for all three divers. This difference ranged from 9° to 18° (mean = 14°).

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Ross H. Sanders and Barry D. Wilson

This study investigated factors contributing to the maximum height achieved by divers after takeoff from the 3m springboard. Twelve elite male divers and 12 elite female divers competing in the 1986 Australian National Championships were filmed using high-speed cinematography. Kinematic and kinetic data for the takeoff phase were derived from the digitized film. Variables analyzed included center of gravity (CG) displacement and velocity, the acceleration of the CG relative to the springboard, and the components of mechanical energy contributing to height achieved by the diver’s CG. Body orientation was described in terms of the angles at the hip, knee, and ankle, and whole body angle of lean. Comparison of timing differences among dive groups and divers was aided by normalizing the data with respect to time. It was found that the height achieved was highly dependent on the rotational requirements of the dive, with males achieving greater heights than females. Divers who achieve good height compared to other divers performing the same dive are characterized by a large vertical velocity at touchdown from the hurdle and a minimization of hip flexion (forward dives) and knee flextion (reverse dives) at takeoff.

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Selina J. Kendal and Ross H. Sanders

The technique of elite New Zealand kayak paddlers using the Norwegian wing paddle was analyzed to identify factors leading to success. Five male New Zealand kayak paddlers were filmed with two high-speed cinematographic cameras. Paths of the blade tip and joint centers were determined from film data. Velocities ranged from 4.63 to 5.38 m/s. Stroke frequency ranged from l .93 to 2.26 cycles/s. Results indicated that the more successful paddlers, based on previous competitive performances, had similar movement patterns and blade paths and that these differed from those of less successful paddlers. Their blade tip and joint center paths were more consistent across trials. More successful paddlers entered their blade well forward and closer to the longitudinal axis of the kayak than did less successful paddlers, and moved the blade a large distance laterally from the kayak and only a small distance backward with respect to the water.

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Ross H. Sanders and Peter C. Owens

Many golf coaches refer to a focal point or “hub” of a golf swing and encourage players to imagine the clubhead rotating about this point. The purpose of this study was to locate the hub of the swings of elite (handicaps 0–5) and novice golfers. Six novice and six elite players (all male) each performed 10 swings with the 3-wood provided. Motions of reflective markers attached to the vertex and chin of the subject and three points along the shaft of the club were recorded on videotape. The position of the hub at sampled instants during the swing was defined by the intersection of normals to the clubhead path. Among elite players the hub was not fixed and the pattern of hub movement was consistent. The radius of the hub to the clubhead reached a maximum near impact. Novice players tended to achieve maximum radius after impact and the hub patterns were inconsistent.

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Nuno Oliveira, David H. Saunders and Ross H. Sanders

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of fatigue on the vertical force and kinematics of the lower limbs during maximal water polo eggbeater kicking.

Methods:

Twelve male water polo players maintained as high a position as possible while performing the eggbeater kick with the upper limbs raised out of the water until they were unable to keep the top of the sternum (manubrium) above water. Data comprising 27 complete eggbeater-kick cycles were extracted corresponding to 9 cycles of the initial nonfatigued (0%), 50% time point (50%), and final fatigued (100%) periods of the trial. Vertical force, foot speed, and hip-, knee-, and ankle-joint angles were calculated.

Results:

Mean vertical force (0%, 212.2 N; 50%, 184.5 N; 100%, 164.3 N) progressively decreased with time. Speed of the feet (0.4 m/s), hip abduction (2.9°), and flexion (3.6°) decreased with fatigue, while hip internal rotation (3.6°) and ankle inversion (4°) increased with fatigue. Average angular velocity decreased for all joint motions.

Conclusions:

Eggbeater-kick performance decreases with fatigue. Inability to maintain foot speeds and hip and ankle actions with progressing fatigue diminishes the ability of the player to produce vertical force during the cycle. Increased internal rotation of the hip when fatigued and the large eversion/abduction of the ankle during the cycle may be predisposing factors for the prevalence of patellofemoral pain syndrome observed among eggbeater-kick performers. Appropriate training interventions that can limit the effects of fatigue on performance and injury risk should be considered.

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Ross H. Sanders, Jane M. Cappaert and David L. Pease

The purpose of this study was to investigate the wave characteristics of breaststroke swimming. Particular emphasis was accorded the question of whether modern breast-stroke is "flylike" (referring to the butterfly stroke) and whether "waves" travel along the body during the breaststroke cycle. Selected body landmarks and the center of mass (CM) of 8 Olympic breaststroke swimmers were quantified. Fourier analysis was conducted to determine the amplitude, frequency composition, and phase characteristics of the vertical undulations of the vertex of the head, shoulders, hips, knees, and ankles. The differences in phase between these landmarks for the first (HI) and second (H2) Fourier frequencies were investigated to establish whether body waves traveled in a caudal direction. While the motion of the upper body was somewhat flylike, the velocity of the HI wave from the hips to ankles was variable among subjects and, for all subjects, was too slow to be propulsive. Contrary to what one would expect, the range of vertical motion of the CM was inversely related to the range of hip vertical motion. The two highest placing subjects, based on preliminary heat times (SI and S4), were distinguished by a large range of hip vertical motion and a small range of CM vertical motion.