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  • Author: Rubens A. da Silva x
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Robson Dias Scoz, Cesar F. Amorim, Bruno O.A. Mazziotti, Rubens A. Da Silva, Edgar R. Vieira, Alexandre D. Lopes, and Ronaldo E.C.D. Gabriel

Objective: To assess the diagnostic validity of an isokinetic testing to detect partial injuries on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Design: Prospective diagnostic study. Settings: Orthopedic clinic, physiotherapy clinic, orthopedic hospital, and diagnostic/image clinic. Participants: Consecutive patients (n = 29) with unilateral knee complaint submitted to physical examination, magnetic resonance images (MRIs), and isokinetic testing prior to surgery of ACL reconstruction. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: The isokinetic torque curves data from extensor and flexor muscles were converted to frequency domain by fast Fourier transformation and compared with healthy contralateral limb. Differences were categorized as unstable knees and these conclusions were compared with patient’s physical examinations (doctor’s conclusion on ACL integrity) and MRIs (as the radiologist conclusions on ACL integrity). After surgery, all intraoperatively confirmed partial injured patient’s data were collected. The diagnostic accuracy measures to compare the conclusions of all 3 professionals included sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, disease prevalence, positive likelihood ratio, and accuracy—all using a confidence interval of 95%. Results: Compared with MRI, the sensitivity of isokinetic test for an ACL partial injury was 90.00%, specificity 83.33%, positive predictive value 52.94%, negative predictive value 97.56%, and accuracy 84.48%. Compared with physical examination, the sensitivity of isokinetic test for an ACL partial injury was 85.71%, specificity 78.43%, positive predictive value 35.29%, negative predictive value 97.56%, and accuracy 79.31%. Conclusions: This method of isokinetic data analysis through fast Fourier transformation can be used to improve diagnostic accuracy of a difficult detection injury. Even present, a partial ACL injury can produce a stable knee during isokinetic testing and could be used to detect candidates for conservative treatment based on strengthening exercises, reducing surgery risks, and financial and social impact on patient’s life.

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Edgar R. Vieira, Ruth Tappen, Sareen S. Gropper, Maria T. Severi, Gabriella Engstrom, Marcio R. de Oliveira, Alexandre C. Barbosa, and Rubens A. da Silva

The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate a 6-month exercise program completed by 10 older Caribbean Americans. Assessments were done at baseline and 3 and 6 months, and included walks on an instrumented mat at preferred speed, and during street crossing simulations with regular (10 s) and reduced time (5 s). There were no significant differences on preferred walking speed over time. Differences between the street crossing conditions were found only at 6 months. Significant changes over time among the assessments were found only during street crossing with reduced time. Street crossing with reduced time was the only walking condition sensitive to capture changes associated with participating in the exercise program. There was a significant increase in dorsiflexion strength overtime. At 6 months it was significantly higher than at baseline and 3 months. The program was feasible, acceptable, and had some positive effects on walking, knee flexion, and dorsiflexion strength.

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Leonardo Shigaki, Cynthia Gobbi Alves Araújo, Mariane Guizeline Calderon, Thais Karoline Cezar Costa, Andreo Fernando Aguiar, Leonardo Oliveira Pena Costa, and Rubens A. da Silva

Context: Strength/resistance training volume has historically been supported in the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations. However, for the back muscles, exercise prescription related to the number of sets, such as single versus multiple, is not well established in the literature. Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 2 training volumes on strength and endurance of back-extensor muscles in untrained young participants with regard to a repeated-measures design. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Laboratory of functional evaluation and human motor performance. Participants: Forty-four untrained young participants (mean age = 21 y) were randomized into single-set (n = 14), multiple-set (MSG, n = 15), and untrained control (n = 15) groups. Intervention: The single-set group and MSG underwent a 10-week progressive resistance training program (2 d/wk) using a 45° Roman chair. Main Outcome Measures: Back maximal strength (dynamometer) and isometric and dynamic endurance (time limit, trunk extension–flexion cycles, and electromyography muscle fatigue estimates). Results: The results showed differences between the MSG and control group for isometric endurance time (mean = 19.8 s; 95% confidence interval, −44.1 to 4.8), but without time intervention significance. Significant improvement after training (P < .05) was found predominantly during dynamic endurance (number of repetitions) for both the MSG (+61%) and single-set group (+26%) compared with preintervention, whereas the control group reported no benefit. There was no significant (P > .05) difference in either strength or electromyography estimates after training. Conclusions: Both multiple and single volume training were efficient in promoting better back endurance during dynamic performance based on mechanical variables (time and number of repetitions).

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Rodolfo B. Parreira, Marcela C. Boer, Lucas Rabello, Viviane de Souza P. Costa, Eros de Oliveira Jr., and Rubens A. da Silva

The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in center of pressure (COP) movement in four time intervals (5, 10, 15 and 30 s) during a one-leg stance test performed by young and elderly adults. Twelve young adults (mean 20 years) and 12 elderly subjects (mean 68 years) participated in this study. The subjects performed three 30 s trials of an eyes open one-leg stance test on a force platform, in which the COP parameter was computed at four points in time from same original COP signal. Significant differences were found between the young and elderly adults (P < .007) only at the 10, 15 and 30 s intervals. For both groups, COP changes were significantly different between the 5 s time interval and other intervals (10, 15 and 30 s). In conclusion, these results pointed out that age-related difference in COP changes were time dependent. This suggests that the use of longer durations increases the possibility of distinguishing more subtle differences in postural strategy among different groups of subjects.

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Alexandre H. Nowotny, Mariane Guizeline Calderon, Bruno Mazziotti O. Alves, Marcio R. de Oliveira, Rodrigo A. de Carvalho Andraus, Andreo F. Aguiar, Cesar F. Amorim, Guillaume Leonard, and Rubens A. da Silva

Context: Chronic low-back pain (CLBP) may be associated with changes in postural balance in athletes as poor postural control during sports practice. Objective: To compare the postural control of athletes with and without CLBP during 2 one-legged stance tasks and identify the center of pressure (COP) cutoff values to determine the main differences. Designed: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Laboratory of functional evaluation and human motor performance. Participants: A total of 56 male athletes, 28 with and 28 without CLBP (mean age = 26 y). Intervention: The one-legged stance with knee extension and with the knee at 30° flexion tasks were measured and analyzed on a force platform. The participants completed three 30-second trials (30 s of rest between each trial). Main Outcome Measures: The COP parameters: the area of COP, mean COP sway velocity in both the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions, and total COP displacement were computed, and a receiver operating characteristics curve analysis was applied to determine the group differences. Results: Athletes with CLBP had poorer postural control (P < .01) in both tasks. The 30° knee flexion reported more postural instability than the knee extension for all COP parameters (a large effect size d = 0.80).The knee extension cutoffs identified were >7.1 cm2 for the COP area, >2.6 cm/s for the COP sway velocity in the anterior-posterior direction, and >3.2 cm/s for the mediolateral direction. Whereas, the 30° knee flexion cutoffs were >10.9 cm2 for the COP area, >2.9 cm/s for the COP sway velocity in the anterior-posterior direction, and >4.1 cm/s for the mediolateral direction. Both measures showed enough sensitivity and specificity (ie, area under the curve = 0.88 in and 0.80, respectively) to discriminate both groups. Conclusions: The athletes with CLBP had poorer postural control than the healthy athletes and obtained specific cutoff scores from the COP values.