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Suresh Joshi, Santosh Jatrana and Yin Paradies

Background:

We investigated the differences and over time changes in recommended physical activity among foreign-born (FB) from English speaking countries (ESC) and non-English speaking countries (NESC) relative to native-born (NB) Australians, and whether the association between nativity and duration of residence (DoR) and physical activity is mediated by English language proficiency, socioeconomic status and social engagement/membership.

Methods:

This study applies multilevel group-meancentered mixed (hybrid) logistic regression models to 12 waves of longitudinal data (12,634 individuals) from the Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia survey with engagement in physical activities for more than 3 times a week as the outcome variable.

Results:

Immigrants from ESC had higher odds of physical activity, while immigrants from NESC had significantly lower odds of physical activity than NB Australians, after adjusting for covariates. There was no evidence that these differences changed by DoR among immigrants from NESC, whereas ESC immigrants had higher odds of physical activity when their DoR was more than 20 years. We also found a mediating role of English language proficiency on immigrants physical activities.

Conclusion:

Appropriate health promotion interventions should be implemented to foster physical activities among NESC immigrants, considering English language proficiency as an important factor in designing interventions.

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Casey Mace Firebaugh, Simon Moyes, Santosh Jatrana, Anna Rolleston and Ngaire Kerse

The relationship between physical activity, function, and mortality is not established in advanced age. Physical activity, function, and mortality were followed in a cohort of Māori and non-Māori adults living in advanced age for a period of 6 years. Generalized linear regression models were used to analyze the association between physical activity and Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living scale, whereas Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the association between the physical activity and mortality. The hazard ratio for mortality for those in the least active physical activity quartile was 4.1 for Māori and 1.8 for non-Māori compared with the most active physical activity quartile. There was an inverse relationship between physical activity and mortality, with lower hazard ratios for mortality at all levels of physical activity. Higher levels of physical activity were associated with lower mortality and higher functional status in advanced-aged adults.

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Casey Mace, Ngaire Kerse, Ralph Maddison, Timothy Olds, Santosh Jatrana, Carol Wham, Mere Kepa, Anna Rolleston, Ruth Teh and Joanna Broad

Background:

Little is known about the physical activity levels and behaviors of advanced age New Zealanders.

Methods:

A cross-sectional analysis of data from Life and Living in Advanced Age: A Cohort Study in New Zealand (LiLACS NZ), Te Puāwaitanga O Nga Tapuwae Kia ora Tonu, measures of physical activity (PASE) (n = 664, aged 80–90 [n = 254, Māori, aged 82.5(2), n = 410 non-Māori, aged 85(.5)]) was conducted to determine physical activity level (PAL). A substudy (n = 45) was conducted to attain detailed information about PAL and behaviors via the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults (MARCA) and accelerometry. The main study was analyzed by sex for Māori and non-Māori.

Results:

Men consistently had higher levels of physical activity than women for all physical activity measures. Sex was significant for different domains of activity.