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Iris Orbach, Robert Singer and Sarah Price

This study aimed to investigate the influence of an attribution training program for learners who attribute their sport performance to dysfunctional attributions. Participants were 35 college beginner tennis players who were oriented to attribute their performance in a tennis skill task to controllable, unstable factors; uncontrollable, stable factors; or no specific factors. Participants received fictitious failure feedback over 10 trial blocks administered during four sessions. Dependent variables included attributions, expectations, emotions, persistence, and performance. MANOVA analyses revealed that it is possible to modify attributions in regard to a tennis performance task. More importantly, the new attributions were consistent up to 3 weeks postintervention and were generalized to a different tennis task. In addition, participants who changed their attributions to more functional ones had higher expectations for future success and experienced positive emotions.

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Lisa Price, Katrina Wyatt, Jenny Lloyd, Charles Abraham, Siobhan Creanor, Sarah Dean and Melvyn Hillsdon

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess children’s compliance with wrist-worn accelerometry during a randomized controlled trial and to examine whether compliance differed by allocated condition or gender. Methods: A total of 886 children within the Healthy Lifestyles Programme trial were randomly allocated to wear a GENEActiv accelerometer at baseline and 18-month follow-up. Compliance with minimum wear-time criteria (≥10 h for 3 weekdays and 1 weekend day) was obtained for both time points. Chi-square tests were used to determine associations between compliance, group allocation, and gender. Results: At baseline, 851 children had usable data, 830 (97.5%) met the minimum wear-time criteria, and 631 (74.1%) had data for 7 days at 24 hours per day. At follow-up, 789 children had usable data, 745 (94.4%) met the minimum wear-time criteria, and 528 (67%) had complete data. Compliance did not differ by gender (baseline: χ2 = 1.66, P = .2; follow-up: χ2 = 0.76, P = .4) or by group at follow-up (χ2 = 2.35, P = .13). Conclusion: The use of wrist-worn accelerometers and robust trial procedures resulted in high compliance at 2 time points regardless of group allocation, demonstrating the feasibility of using precise physical activity monitors to measure intervention effectiveness.

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Lisa Price, Katrina Wyatt, Jenny Lloyd, Charles Abraham, Siobhan Creanor, Sarah Dean and Melvyn Hillsdon

Background: Physical activity guidelines state that children should achieve at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on each day of the week. Accurate assessment of adherence to these guidelines should, ideally, include measurement over 7 days. When less than 7 days of data are available, researchers often report the average minutes of MVPA per day as a proxy for 7-day measurement. The aim of this study was to compare prevalence estimates generated by average MVPA per day versus MVPA assessed over 7 days. Methods: Data were collected as part of the Healthy Lifestyles Programme. One class from each school was randomized to wear a GENEActiv accelerometer for 8 days. The percentages of children achieving an average of ≥60 minutes of MVPA per day and those achieving ≥60 minutes of MVPA on each of 7 days were calculated. Results: A total of 807 children provided 7 days of data. When the average MVPA per day was calculated, 30.6% (n = 247) of children accumulated ≥60 minutes of MVPA per day. Only 3.2% (n = 26) accumulated ≥60 minutes of MVPA on every day of the week. Conclusion: Previous studies utilizing average MVPA per day are likely to have overestimated the percentage of children meeting recommendations.

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Sarah Price, Richard H. Williams, Christopher Wilburn, Portia Williams, Danielle Wadsworth, Wendi Weimar, Jared Russell and Mary E. Rudisill

This article presents an overview of how faculty in the School of Kinesiology at Auburn University (AU) are working with minority-serving institutions in similar disciplines to promote diversity and inclusion. Florida A&M (FAMU) and Albany State University (ASU) are both Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), and AU is a Predominantly White Institution (PWI). Part of this initiative has been accomplished through the development of AU’s Future Scholars Summer Research Bridge Program in partnership with south-eastern HBCUs. Success has been measured as an increase in student recruitment and increased opportunities for students from underrepresented groups seeking graduate opportunities. The partnership between FAMU and AU has also provided opportunities for faculty and students to promote diversity and be more inclusive through research collaborations. These partnerships are addressing this important need to be more purposeful in our efforts of establishing greater diversity and being a more inclusive discipline.

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Anna E. Price, Sara J. Corwin, Daniela B. Friedman, Sarah B. Laditka, Natalie Colabianchi and Kara M. Montgomery

Physical activity may promote cognitive health in older adults. Popular media play an important role in preventive health communication. This study examined articles discussing associations between physical activity and cognitive health in top-circulating magazines targeting older adults. 42,753 pages of magazines published from 2006 to 2008 were reviewed; 26 articles met inclusion criteria. Explanations regarding the link between physical activity and cognitive health were provided in 57.7% of articles. These explanations were generally consistent with empirical evidence; however, few articles included empirical evidence. Physical activity recommendations were presented in 80.8% of articles; a wide range was recommended (90–300 min of physical activity per wk). Socioeconomic status and education level were not mentioned in the text. Results suggest an opportunity for greater coverage regarding the role of physical activity in promoting cognitive health in popular media. Magazine content would benefit from including more empirical evidence, culturally sensitive content, and physical activity recommendations that are consistent with U.S. guidelines.