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  • Author: Sean Scantlebury x
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Thomas Sawczuk, Ben Jones, Sean Scantlebury, and Kevin Till

Purpose: To assess the relationships between training load, sleep duration, and 3 daily well-being, recovery, and fatigue measures in youth athletes. Methods: Fifty-two youth athletes completed 3 maximal countermovement jumps (CMJs), a daily well-being questionnaire (DWB), the perceived recovery status scale (PRS), and provided details on their previous day’s training loads (training) and self-reported sleep duration (sleep) on 4 weekdays over a 7-week period. Partial correlations, linear mixed models, and magnitude-based inferences were used to assess the relationships between the predictor variables (training and sleep) and the dependent variables (CMJ, DWB, and PRS). Results: There was no relationship between CMJ and training (r = −.09; ±.06) or sleep (r = .01; ±.06). The DWB was correlated with sleep (r = .28; ±.05, small), but not training (r = −.05; ±.06). The PRS was correlated with training (r = −.23; ±.05, small), but not sleep (r = .12; ±.06). The DWB was sensitive to low sleep (d = −0.33; ±0.11) relative to moderate; PRS was sensitive to high (d = −0.36; ±0.11) and low (d = 0.29; ±0.17) training relative to moderate. Conclusions: The PRS is a simple tool to monitor the training response, but DWB may provide a greater understanding of the athlete’s overall well-being. The CMJ was not associated with the training or sleep response in this population.

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Thomas Sawczuk, Ben Jones, Mitchell Welch, Clive Beggs, Sean Scantlebury, and Kevin Till

Purpose: To evaluate the relative importance and predictive ability of salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) measures with regards to upper respiratory illness (URI) in youth athletes. Methods: Over a 38-week period, 22 youth athletes (age = 16.8 [0.5] y) provided daily symptoms of URI and 15 fortnightly passive drool saliva samples, from which s-IgA concentration and secretion rate were measured. Kernel-smoothed bootstrapping generated a balanced data set with simulated data points. The random forest algorithm was used to evaluate the relative importance (RI) and predictive ability of s-IgA concentration and secretion rate with regards to URI symptoms present on the day of saliva sampling (URIday), within 2 weeks of sampling (URI2wk), and within 4 weeks of sampling (URI4wk). Results: The percentage deviation from average healthy s-IgA concentration was the most important feature for URIday (median RI 1.74, interquartile range 1.41–2.07). The average healthy s-IgA secretion rate was the most important feature for URI4wk (median RI 0.94, interquartile range 0.79–1.13). No feature was clearly more important than any other when URI symptoms were identified within 2 weeks of sampling. The values for median area under the curve were 0.68, 0.63, and 0.65 for URIday, URI2wk, and URI4wk, respectively. Conclusions: The RI values suggest that the percentage deviation from average healthy s-IgA concentration may be used to evaluate the short-term risk of URI, while the average healthy s-IgA secretion rate may be used to evaluate the long-term risk. However, the results show that neither s-IgA concentration nor secretion rate can be used to accurately predict URI onset within a 4-week window in youth athletes.