Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Sheri A. Hale x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Sheri A. Hale

Objective:

To review the etiology of patellar tendinopathy as it relates to clinical management of chronic patellar-tendon disease in athletes.

Data Sources:

Information was gathered from a MEDLINE search of literature in English using the key words patellar tendinitis, patellar tendonitis, patellar tendinosis, patellar tendinopathy, and jumper’s knee.

Study Selection:

All relevant peer-reviewed literature in English was reviewed.

Data Synthesis:

The etiology of patellar tendinopathy is multifactorial, incorporating both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Age, muscle flexibility, training program, and knee-joint dynamics have all been associated with patellar tendinopathy. The roles of gender, body morphology, and patellar mobility in patellar tendinopathy are unclear.

Conclusions:

The pathoetiology of patellar tendinopathy is a complex process that results from both an inflammatory response and degenerative changes. There is a tremendous need for research to improve our understanding of the pathoetiology of patellar tendinopathy and its clinical management.

Restricted access

Jay Hertel, Craig R. Denegar, Phil D. Johnson, Sheri A. Hale and W.E. Buckley

Two studies were performed to estimate the reliability of the Cybex Reactor in assessing agility tasks. In Study 1, participants (n =13) underwent identical testing sessions twice in 1 week. In Study 2, participants (n = 13) underwent identical testing sessions twice in 1 week, once 3 weeks later, and once 6 weeks later. Testing sessions consisted of four identical agility tasks requiring participants to react to cues shown on a video monitor. In Study 1, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were .47 for Day 1 and .75 for Day 2 for time to complete each task. Participants performed faster on Day 2 (p < .05). In Study 2, ICC ranged from .58 to .83. ICC between sessions ranged from .59 to .73. Participants performed significantly faster each successive session except between Weeks 3 and 6 (p < .05). The Reactor appears to be reliable in assessing agility tasks with test–retest intervals of up to 6 weeks.