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Shilpa Dogra

Poor self-perceived health (SPH) is associated with lower levels of physical activity (PA) and the presence of chronic disease in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether SPH is associated with PA levels in older adults with existing chronic disease and whether this differs by disease. Using logistic regressions on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (N = 33,168) it was found that adjusted logistic regressions revealed that odds of physical inactivity were similar in those with good SPH who reported having respiratory, musculoskeletal, or other chronic disease compared with those with good SPH without these diseases. Those with good SPH who reported having cardiometabolic disease were at significantly greater risk of physical inactivity than those with good SPH without cardiometabolic disease. It is apparent from the current analysis that SPH plays an important role in PA levels of older adults with chronic disease and should be targeted in future interventions.

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Heather McCracken and Shilpa Dogra

The purpose of this study was to quantify sedentary time among recreational and Masters (competitive) athletes aged 55 and older. A cross-sectional survey including questions on demographics, sport participation, as well as a short form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and the Measure of Older Adult’s Sedentary Time questionnaire was administered (n = 203). Male Masters athletes reported more time spent in vigorous intensity physical activity and less time watching TV than recreational athletes. Among females, being a Masters athlete was associated with being more sedentary than being a recreational athlete, while among males, being a recreational athlete was associated with being more sedentary. The intensity and duration that older Masters and recreational athletes spent in their sport was inversely associated with the amount of sedentary time accumulated. Future research using inclinometers is needed to further elucidate sedentary time in older male and female athletes.

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Carley O’Neill and Shilpa Dogra

Background:

Exercise triggers asthma symptoms among adults with exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIBC). This may lead to lower physical activity levels among this population. The purpose of this study was to assess perceived exertion (RPE), perceived breathlessness (RPD), affect (FS), and physical activity enjoyment during and following an acute bout of high intensity interval exercise (HIIE), moderate intensity interval (MIIE) and moderate intensity continuous exercise (MICE) in adults with EIBC.

Methods:

RPD, RPE, and FS were assessed each minute during the sessions and enjoyment was assessed following each session (n = 11).

Results:

RPE was lower during MIIE compared with MICE (P = .006). RPD was lowest during MIIE but was not different between HIIE and MICE. Affect was lower in MICE than HIIE in the last minute of exercise (P = .003) and overall was greatest during the MIIE (P = .022; P = .018). Enjoyment scores were similar between protocols.

Conclusions:

Interval exercise is associated with lower ratings of perceived exertion and dyspnea, an increase in in-task affect, and similar physical activity enjoyment when compared with continuous exercise.

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Shilpa Dogra, Ban Al-Sahab, James Manson and Hala Tamim

The purpose of the current study was to determine whether aging expectations (AE) are associated with physical activity participation and health among older adults of low socioeconomic status (SES). A cross-sectional analysis of a sample of 170 older adults (mean age 70.9 years) was conducted. Data on AE, physical activity, and health were collected using the 12 item Expectations Regarding Aging instrument, the Healthy Physical Activity Participation Questionnaire, and the Short Form-36, respectively. Adjusted linear regression models showed significant associations between AE and social functioning, energy/vitality, mental health, and self-rated general health, as well as physical activity. These results suggest that AE may help to better explain the established association between low SES, low physical activity uptake, and poor health outcomes among older adults.

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Jennifer Brunet, Lori Dithurbide, Shilpa Dogra, Kim Gammage, Mary Jung, Lindsay Kipp, Tara-Leigh McHugh, Simon Sebire, Katherine Tamminen and Kathleen Wilson

Edited by Christopher Shields

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Christopher Shields, Jennifer Brunet, Lori Dithurbide, Shilpa Dogra, Kim Gammage, Mary Jung, Lindsay Kipp, Tara-Leigh McHugh, Simon Sebire, Katherine Tamminen and Kathleen Wilson

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Christopher Shields, Jennifer Brunet, Lori Dithurbide, Shilpa Dogra, Kim Gammage, Mary Jung, Lindsay Kipp, Tara-Leigh McHugh, Simon Sebire, Katherine Tamminen and Kathleen Wilson

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Christopher Shields, Jennifer Brunet, Lori Dithurbide, Shilpa Dogra, Kim Gammage, Mary Jung, Lindsay Kipp, Tara-Leigh McHugh, Simon Sebire, Katherine Tamminen and Kathleen Wilson

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Christopher Shields, Jennifer Brunet, Lori Dithurbide, Shilpa Dogra, Kim Gammage, Mary Jung, Lindsay Kipp, Tara-Leigh McHugh, Simon Sebire, Katherine Tamminen and Kathleen S. Wilson

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Jennifer Brunet, Lori Dithurbide, Shilpa Dogra, Kim Gammage, Mary Jung, Tara-Leigh McHugh, Simon Sebire, Cheryl Stuntz, Katherine Tamminen and Kathleen Wilson

Edited by Christopher Shields