Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Shingo Oda x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Shinya Fujii and Shingo Oda

The aim of this study is to establish the effects of stick use on rhythmic bimanual coordination in drummers. Eighteen drummers performed a rapid antiphase coordination task using their fingers and handheld drumsticks. We found no significant differences in the speed of tapping between finger and stick-use tapping, while stick-use tapping had a larger peak force and smaller variability in coordination pattern than finger tapping. As a consequence, the quotient of the number of taps divided by the variability of coordination pattern, named the bimanual performance quotient, was higher for stick-use tapping than for finger tapping. A significant correlation was found between years of drumming experience and the bimanual performance quotient for both finger and stick-use tapping, but not between the years of drumming experience and the degree of improvement in the bimanual performance quotient with stick use relative to finger tapping. These results indicate that stick use enhances drummers’ bimanual coordination during rapid alternate tapping, whereas the degree of improvement with stick use does not depend on drumming experience.

Restricted access

Hiroshige Tateuchi, Noriaki Ichihashi, Masahiro Shinya and Shingo Oda

Patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) have difficulty with mediolateral postural control. Since the symptom of hip OA includes joint pain, which mostly occurs upon initial movement, patients with hip OA might have disabling problems with movement initiation. This study aimed to identify the movement strategy during the anticipatory postural adjustments in the lateral step motion in patients with hip OA. We studied 18 female subjects with unilateral hip OA and 10 healthy subjects, and measured temporal, kinetic, and kinematic variables. Patients with hip OA required a longer duration of anticipation phase than the control subjects, the total duration of lateral stepping was not different between the groups. Displacement of the center of mass to the supporting (affected) side during the anticipation phase was not different between the two groups. These findings suggest that, in patients with hip OA, the center of mass slowly moved to the affected side. Furthermore, patients with hip OA showed greater shift of the trunk to the supporting side than did the control subjects. These movement characteristics might contribute to the achievement of both protection of the affected hip joint and quickness in the subsequent lateral step in patients with hip OA.

Restricted access

Shinya Fujii, Kazutoshi Kudo, Masahiro Shinya, Tatsuyuki Ohtsuki and Shingo Oda

This study investigated performance and wrist muscle activity during rapid-repetitive unimanual tapping with a drumstick in right-handed drummers and nondrummers. Analyses of performances revealed no difference in tapping frequency and peak tap force between drummers and nondrummers, although the drummers showed less variability in intertap interval than the nondrummers. Analyses of the electromyographic (EMG) data obtained by recording the activity of the flexor carpi ulnalis and the extensor carpi radialis muscles of the right wrist revealed several distinct differences between the two groups: the drummers showed a lower level of muscle cocontraction together with an earlier decline of wrist flexor muscle activity and a smaller variability of muscle activation time in the wrist flexors compared with the nondrummers. We suggest that these characteristics in wrist muscle activity in the drummers have been acquired following extensive practice for the efficient use of wrist muscles and stable drumming performance.