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  • Author: Shirleeah D. Fayson x
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Shirleeah D. Fayson, Alan R. Needle and Thomas W. Kaminski

Context:

The use of Kinesio Tape among health care professional has grown recently in efforts to efficiently prevent and treat joint injuries. However, limited evidence exists regarding the efficacy of this technique in enhancing joint stability and neuromuscular control.

Objective:

To determine how Kinesio Tape application to the ankle joint alters forces and muscle activity during a drop-jump maneuver.

Design:

Single-group pretest– posttest.

Setting:

University laboratory.

Subjects:

22 healthy adults with no previous history of ankle injury.

Interventions:

Participants were instrumented with electromyography on the lower-leg muscles as they jumped from a 35-cm platform onto force plates. Test trials were performed without tape (BL), immediately after application of Kinesio Tape to the ankle (KT-I), and after 24 h of continued use (KT-24).

Main Outcome Measures:

Peak ground-reaction forces (GRFs) and time to peak GRF were compared across taping conditions, and the timing and amplitude of muscle activity from the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and lateral gastrocnemius were compared across taping conditions.

Results:

No significant differences in amplitude or timing of GRFs were observed (P > .05). However, muscle activity was observed to decrease from BL to KT-I in the tibialis anterior (P = .027) and from BL to KT-24 in the PL (P = .022).

Conclusions:

The data suggest that Kinesio Tape decreases muscle activity in the ankle during a drop-jump maneuver, although no changes in GRFs were observed. This is contrary to the proposed mechanisms of Kinesio Tape. Further research might investigate how this affects participants with a history of injury.

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Lisa M. Stobierski, Shirleeah D. Fayson, Lindsay M. Minthorn, Tamara C. Valovich McLeod and Cailee E. Welch

Clinical Scenario:

Injuries are inevitable in the physically active population. As a part of preventive medicine, health care professionals often seek clinical tools that can be used in real time to identify factors that may predispose individuals to these injuries. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS), a clinical tool consisting of 7 individual tasks, has been reported as useful in identifying individuals in various populations that may be susceptible to musculoskeletal injuries. If factors that may predispose physically active individuals to injury could be identified before participation, clinicians may be able to develop a training plan based on FMS scores, which could potentially decrease the likelihood of injury and overall time missed from physical activities. However, in order for a screening tool to be used clinically, it must demonstrate acceptable reliability.

Focused Clinical Question:

Are clinicians reliable at scoring the FMS, in real time, to assess movement patterns of physically active individuals?

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Lindsay M. Minthorn, Shirleeah D. Fayson, Lisa M. Stobierski, Cailee E. Welch and Barton E. Anderson

Clinical Scenario:

Appropriate movement patterns during sports and physical activities are important for both athletic performance and injury prevention. The assessment of movement dysfunction can assist clinicians in implementing appropriate rehabilitation programs after injury, as well as developing injury-prevention plans. No gold standard test exists for the evaluation of movement capacity; however, the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) has been recommended as a tool to screen for movement-pattern limitations and side-to-side movement asymmetries. Limited research has suggested that movement limitations and asymmetries may be linked to increased risk for injury. While this line of research is continuing to evolve, the use of the FMS to measure movement capacity and the development of intervention programs to improve movement patterns has become popular. Recently, additional research examining changes in movement patterns after standardized intervention programs has emerged.

Clinical Question:

Does an individualized training program improve movement patterns in adults who participate in high-intensity activities?