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Masashi Miyashita, Stephen F. Burns and David J. Stensel

The current study investigated the acute effects of accumulating short bouts of running on circulating concentrations of postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Ten men, age 21–32 yr, completed two 1-d trials. On 1 occasion participants ran at 70% of maximum oxygen uptake in six 5-min bouts (i.e., 8:30, 10, and 11:30 a.m. and 1, 2:30, and 4 p.m.) with 85 min rest between runs. On another occasion participants rested throughout the day. In both trials, participants consumed test meals at 9 a.m. and 12 p.m. In each trial, venous blood samples were collected at 8:30, 10, and 11:30 a.m. and 1, 2:30, 4, and 5:30 p.m. for plasma TAG measurement and at 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. for serum CRP measurement. Total area under the curve for plasma TAG concentration versus time was 10% lower on the exercise trial than the control trial (M ± SEM: 13.5 ± 1.8 vs. 15.0 ± 1.9 mmol · 9 hr−1 · L−1; p = .004). Serum CRP concentrations did not differ between trials or over time. This study demonstrates that accumulating short bouts of running reduces postprandial plasma TAG concentrations (a marker for cardiovascular disease risk) but does not alter serum CRP concentrations.

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Stephen F. Burns, Hnin Hnin Oo and Anh Thanh Thuy Tran

The current study examined the effect of sprint interval exercise on postexercise oxygen consumption, respiratory-exchange ratio (RER), substrate oxidation, and blood pressure in adolescents. Participants were 10 normal-weight healthy youth (7 female), age 15–18 years. After overnight fasts, each participant undertook 2 trials in a random balanced order: (a) two 30-s bouts of sprint interval exercise on a cycle ergometer and (b) rested in the laboratory for an equivalent period. Timematched measurements of oxygen consumption, RER, and blood pressure were made 90 min into recovery, and substrate oxidation were calculated over the time period. Total postexercise oxygen uptake was significantly higher in the exercise than control trial over the 90 min (mean [SD]: control 20.0 [6.0] L, exercise 24.8 [9.8] L; p = .030). After exercise, RER was elevated above control but then fell rapidly and was lower than control 30–60 min postexercise, and fat oxidation was significantly higher in the exercise than control trial 45–60 min postexercise. However, total fat oxidation did not differ between trials (control 4.5 [2.5] g, exercise 5.4 [2.7] g; p = .247). Post hoc tests revealed that systolic blood pressure was significantly lower than in control at 90 min postexercise (control 104 [10] mm Hg, exercise 99 [10] mm Hg; p < .05). These data indicate that acute sprint interval exercise leads to short-term increases in oxygen uptake and reduced blood pressure in youth. The authors suggest that health outcomes in response to sprint interval training be examined in children.

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Stephen F. Burns, Keith Shannon and Jeffrey Potteiger

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Stephen F. Burns, Masashi Miyashita, Chihoko Ueda and David J. Stensel

The present study examined how multiple bouts of resistance exercise, performed over 1 d, influence 2 risk factors—postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) and serum C-reactive-protein (CRP) concentrations—associated with coronary heart disease. Twenty-four men age 23.5 (SD 3.4) y completed two 2-d trials, exercise and control, at least 1 wk apart in a counterbalanced randomized design. On day 1 of the exercise trials participants completed 20 sets of 15 repetitions of 5 different resistance exercises divided into five 45-min bouts of exercise—100 sets and 1500 repetitions in total for all exercises. Exercises were performed at 30–40% of 1-repetition maximum. Blood samples were taken before and after exercise. On day 1 of the control trial participants were inactive, with blood samples taken at time points corresponding to the exercise trial. On day 2 of both trials participants consumed a test meal (0.89 g fat, 1.23 g carbohydrate, 0.4 g protein, 60 kJ per kg body mass). Blood samples were obtained fasted and for 6 h post prandially. Total area under the postprandial TAG concentration versus time curve was 12% lower in the exercise than in the control trial (8.76 [3.54] vs. 9.94 [4.31] mmol·L-1·6 h, respectively; P = 0.037). Serum CRP concentrations did not change over the 2 d in the control trial but increased in the exercise trial: trial × time interaction (P = 0.028). Multiple bouts of resistance exercise reduce postprandial TAG concentrations but increase serum CRP concentrations. The extent to which these findings are clinically relevant requires further study.

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Ching T. Lye, Swarup Mukherjee and Stephen F. Burns

This study examined if plant sterols and walking reduce postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations in Chinese men with elevated body mass index (≥ 23.5 kg/m2). Fifteen Chinese men (mean [SD]: age = 25 [3] years and body mass index = 26.2 [1.5] kg/m2] completed four 10-day trials in random order with a 7- to 10-day washout between trials: (a) daily consumption of a control margarine while sedentary (C-S), (b) daily consumption of margarine containing 2 g/day of plant sterols while sedentary (PS-S), (c) daily consumption of a control margarine with 30-min daily walking (C-W), and (d) daily consumption of margarine containing 2 g/day of plant sterols with 30-min daily walking (PS-W). On Day 11 of each trial, postprandial TAG was measured after a high-fat milkshake. The 5-hr total area under the TAG curve was 22%, 25%, and 12% lower on PS-W (mean [SD]: 8.9 [4.3] mmol·5 hr/L) than C-S (11.4 [4.5] mmol·5 hr/L; p = .005; d = 0.56), PS-S (11.9 [4.9] mmol·5 hr/L; p = .004; d = 0.67), and C-W (10.1 [4.4] mmol·5 hr/L; p = .044; d = 0.27) trials, respectively. Similarly, 5-hr incremental area for PS-W (4.5 [2.7] mmol·5 hr/L) was 31%, 32%, and 18% lower than C-S (6.6 [3.3] mmol·5 hr/L; p = .005; d = 0.62), PS-S (6.6 [3.4] mmol·5 hr/L; p = .004; d = 0.64), and C-W (5.5 [2.8] mmol·5 hr/L; p = .032; d = 0.29). Ten days of daily plant sterol intake combined with walking presents an intervention strategy to lower postprandial TAG in Chinese men with elevated body mass index.

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Jesudas E. Menon, David J. Stensel, Keith Tolfrey and Stephen F. Burns

Purpose: This study examined how manipulating meal frequency, with and without exercise, affects postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG). Methods: Fourteen sedentary men completed four 2-day trials in a noncounterbalanced random cross-over order: (1) consumption of 1 large high-fat milkshake without exercise (1-CON), (2) consumption of 2 smaller high-fat milkshakes without exercise (2-CON), (3) consumption of 1 large high-fat milkshake with exercise (1-EX), and (4) consumption of 2 small high-fat milkshakes with exercise (2-EX)—total energy intake was standardized across trials. On day 1, participants rested (1-CON and 2-CON) or walked briskly for 60 minutes (1-EX and 2-EX). On day 2, participants consumed either a single large high-fat milkshake (75% fat; 1-CON and 1-EX) for breakfast or 2 smaller isoenergetic milkshakes (2-CON and 2-EX) for breakfast and lunch. Plasma TAG were measured fasting and for 7 hours after breakfast. Results: Peak incremental TAG was 30% lower on 2-EX than 1-CON (P = .04, d = 0.38). Postprandial TAG increased more rapidly in the first 4 hours in 1-CON than other trials; but at 6 hours, TAG was exaggerated in 2-CON compared with 1-CON. Conclusions: Increasing meal frequency after exercise, without altering overall fat intake, attenuates postprandial TAG.