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Thomas W. Buford, Douglas B. Smith, Matthew S. O’Brien, Aric J. Warren and Stephen J. Rossi

Purpose:

The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the physiological response of collegiate wrestlers to their competitive season.

Methods:

Eleven Division I collegiate wrestlers (mean ± SD; 19.45 ± 1.13 y) volunteered and completed 4 testing sessions throughout the course of the collegiate wrestling season. Testing sessions were conducted pre-, mid-, and postseason, as well as before the national tournament. Testing consisted of weigh-in, skinfold body composition testing, and a 50-rep concentric, isokinetic leg extension muscle endurance test (180°/s). Muscular performance variables measured included peak torque, peak torque at fatigue, percent decline, and peak torque/body mass ratio.

Results:

A significant increase (P < .05) of 2.9% was observed for body mass between midseason and postseason (2.38 kg). From pre- to postseason, a mean increase of 3.8% (3.1 kg) was observed for body mass. An increase (P < .05) in BF% of 2.9% was observed between prenationals and postseason. No significant differences (P > .05) were observed between consecutive time points for quadriceps peak torque; however, there was a significant increase (P < .05) between preseason and prenationals (23.39 N·m). Peak torque at fatigue was greater (P < .05) at midseason than preseason, representing an increase of 9.82 N·m. Between midseason and prenationals testing, we observed an 11% increase (P < .05) in %DCLN. Finally, we noted an increase (P < .05) from 0.6 to 0.69 in peak torque/body mass ratio between preseason and prenationals.

Conclusions:

Our results indicate that while force values seem to suffer at midseason, the wrestlers compensated and were strongest just before their national competition.

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Stephen J. Rossi, Thomas W. Buford, Douglas B. Smith, Robin Kennel, Erin E. Haff and G. Gregory Haff

Purpose:

The primary purpose of this study was to simultaneously analyze both ends of the barbell with 19 weightlifters (age 18.0 ± 3.2 years, body mass 84.0 ± 14.2 kg, height 167.3 ± 8.7 cm) participating in a weightlifting competition to determine whether there were asymmetries in barbell kinematics and kinetics between the right and left sides of the barbell. The second purpose was to compare barbell-trajectory classification of the snatch and clean lifts between the right and left sides of the barbell.

Methods:

Barbell kinematic and kinetic data were collected and analyzed with 2 VS-120 weightlifting-analysis systems (Lipman Electronic Engineering Ltd, Ramat Hahayal, Israel). Barbell trajectories (A, B, and C) for the right and left sides were analyzed for each lift.

Results:

No significant difference was found in trajectory classification between sides of the barbell for either lift. The frequencies analysis revealed that type C barbell trajectories were the most prevalent in each lift. When the right and left sides of the barbell were compared during the snatch and clean, no significant differences were determined for any kinematic or kinetic variables.

Conclusions:

The V-scope system appears to facilitate analysis of barbell kinematics, kinetics, and trajectories during weightlifting competition regardless of which side of the barbell is analyzed.