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William McGarvey, Richard Jones and Stewart Petersen

The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of interval (INT) and continuous (CON) cycle exercise on excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). Twelve males first completed a graded exercise test for VO2max and then the two exercise challenges in random order on separate days approximately 1 wk apart. The INT challenge consisted of seven 2 min work intervals at 90% VO2max, each followed by 3 min of relief at 30% VO2max. The CON exercise consisted of 30 to 32 min of continuous cycling at 65% VO2max. Gas exchange and heart rate (HR) were measured for 30 min before, during, and for 2 h post-exercise. Three methods were used to analyze post-exercise oxygen consumption and all produced similar results. There were no significant differences in either the magnitude or duration of EPOC between the CON and INT protocols. HR, however, was higher (P < 0.05) while respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was lower (P < 0.05) following INT. These results indicate that when total work was similar, the magnitude and duration of EPOC were similar following CON or INT exercise. The differences in HR and RER during recovery suggest differential physiological responses to the exercise challenges.

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Rudolph H. Dressendorfer, Stewart R. Petersen, Shona E. Moss Lovshin and Carl L. Keen

This study examined the effects of intense endurance training on basal plasma and 24-hour urinary calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) levels in 9 male competitive cyclists. The supervised training program followed a baseline period and included a volume phase (6 weeks, averaging 87% of maximal heart rate [HRmax]), an interval phase (18 days, 100% of HRmax), and a 10-day unloading taper. The primary training outcome measure was 20-km time-trial cycling performance. Subjects ate unrestricted diets and maintained their weight. Compared to baseline, performance improved significantly (p < .05), while mineral metabolism was not significantly different after the volume phase. However, after the interval phase, renal Ca excretion increased (p < .05) and plasma Ca fell slightly below the clinical norm. As compared to the interval phase, urinary Ca decreased (p < .05), plasma Ca increased (p < .05), and performance further improved (p < .05) after the taper. Whereas Mg, Fe, Zn, and Cu metabolism remained unchanged throughout the study, greater renal Ca excretion was associated with very high intensity interval training.