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  • Author: Stijn De Baere x
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Stijn De Baere, Renaat Philippaerts, Kristine De Martelaer and Johan Lefevre

Background:

Our aim was to investigate the association between different components of physical activity (PA) and health-related fitness in 10-to 14-year-old children.

Methods:

241 children were recruited from 15 primary and 15 secondary schools. PA was assessed using the SenseWear Mini and an electronic diary. Health-related fitness was assessed using Eurofit and translated into indicators of body fatness, cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular fitness. Associations between PA intensity and physical fitness components were determined using multiple linear regression models adjusted for possible confounders and the contribution of PA domains per intensity categories was calculated.

Results:

Associations between PA intensities and body fatness were low to moderate (|β| = 0.09 to 0.44), explaining up to 6% of the variance in boys and 17% in girls. For cardiorespiratory fitness, associations were higher (|β| = 0.17 to 0.56), with PA explaining up to 6% of the variance in boys and 31% in girls. Low-tomoderate associations (|β| = 0.06 to 0.43) were found for muscular fitness, with PA explaining up to 7% in boys and 13% in girls. Stronger associations were found for sedentary and light activities.

Conclusions:

Low-to-moderate associations between PA and fitness components were observed, with higher associations in girls. Sedentary and light intensity activity showed the strongest link with body fatness, cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular fitness.

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Jan Seghers, Stijn De Baere, Maïté Verloigne and Greet Cardon

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Stijn De Baere, Jan Seghers, Renaat Philippaerts, Kristine De Martelaer and Johan Lefevre

Background:

to investigate levels of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) in 10- to 14-year-olds and to determine PA differences between week-weekend days, genders and school stages.

Methods:

241 children were recruited from 15 primary and 15 secondary schools. PA was assessed for 7 days using the SenseWear Mini Armband and an electronic diary. Week-weekend and gender differences were determined using 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA. Combined intensity- and domain-specific PA differences between genders and school stages were examined using 2-way ANOVA.

Results:

Weekdays were more active compared with weekend days. Physical activity level (PAL) of boys was higher compared with girls. Boys showed more moderate (+15 min/day) and vigorous PA (+9 min/day), no differences were found for SB and light PA. Secondary school children showed more SB (+111 min/day), moderate (+8 min/day) and vigorous (+9 min/day) PA and less light PA (-66 min/day) compared with primary school children. No difference was found for PAL. The results of the combined intensity- and domain-specific parameters revealed more nuanced differences between genders and school stages.

Conclusions:

Our results demonstrate the complexity of PA and SB behavior of children, indicating the need for a multidimensional and differentiated approach in PA promotion.

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Sara Knaeps, Stijn De Baere, Jan Bourgois, Evelien Mertens, Ruben Charlier and Johan Lefevre

Background: The purpose of the current study was to apply a more novel approach to systematically examine (1) associations of clustered cardiometabolic risk and cardiometabolic risk factors and (2) theoretical substitution of sedentary time with either sleep, light physical activity (LPA), or moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and substituting LPA with MVPA. Methods: Physical activity and sleep were objectively measured in 410 Flemish adults [55.5 (9.6) y, 64% men] with a SenseWear Pro 3 Armband. Cardiometabolic risk factors (obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and hypertension) and cardiorespiratory fitness were objectively measured. Isotemporal substitution analyses were performed to assess the associations between substituting time from a potentially negative behavior into another potentially positive behavior. Results: Theoretical substitution of sedentary time with MVPA was associated with decreased clustered cardiometabolic risk, b = −0.06 (−0.08 to −0.04), and substituting LPA with MVPA was associated with a decrease in clustered cardiometabolic risk, b = −0.08 (−0.11 to −0.04). Substituting sedentary time with LPA or sleep improved high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and waist circumference. Conclusion: Theoretical replacement of sedentary time with either sleep, LPA, or MVPA was positively associated with improved cardiometabolic risk factor status. Interventions for increasing cardiometabolic health can focus on replacing sedentary time with either sleep, LPA, or MVPA depending on the risk parameters that need to be targeted.