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  • Author: Suzan F. Ayers x
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Linda L. Griffin and Suzan F. Ayers

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Suzan F. Ayers and Linda L. Griffin

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Amelia Mays Woods and Suzan F. Ayers

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Suzan F. Ayers and Lynn D. Housner

The current study describes the nature of physical education teacher education (PETE) programs in the United States. Of the 200 institutions of higher education invited to participate, 116 PETE programs completed a comprehensive questionnaire regarding their undergraduate programs (58% response rate). Respondents reported employing an average of 3.84 (SD = 2.80) full-time and 3.07 (SD = 3.52) part-time faculty members, nearly equal in gender (females = 48%), and overly representative of Caucasians (92% of respondents reported employing a faculty of at least 60% Caucasian). First- and second-year field-based teaching experiences were provided by 77% of respondents. A majority (65.8%) of institutions provided student teaching experiences at the elementary and either middle or high school settings. These experiences typically lasted 9 weeks and were supervised by university personnel three times per setting, and 76.3% were conducted exclusively by PETE faculty. Emphasis on specific curricular models was reported by 83% of respondents, 45.3% reported electronic portfolio development as a primary technology experience, and 62% reported coursework as the primary means by which candidates received multicultural experiences.

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Suzan F. Ayers and Amelia Mays Woods

Background/Purpose: This aspect of this study examined physical education teacher education (PETE) program coordinators’ perspectives on their role in student recruitment, including common recruitment strategies and their effectiveness, perceived barriers to engaging in program recruitment, and commonly used marketing strategies. Method: Data were collected from 175 PETE program coordinators through the online survey described fully in Chapter 4 of this monograph. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation coefficients, and one-way analyses of variance. Results: Strategies perceived as effective in recruiting high school students were moderately associated with those most often implemented (r = .46–.50). Some limited differences by Carnegie level were found related to reported barriers to participation in recruitment activities. Discussion/Conclusion: This study reveals general consistency between PETE coordinators’ perceptions of the most effective and frequently used recruitment strategies to attract students into PETE initial licensure programs. Strategies, barriers, and suggested future directions align with much of the PETE recruitment literature.

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Ben D. Kern, K. Andrew R. Richards, Suzan F. Ayers and Chad M. Killian

Background/Purpose: Physical education teacher education (PETE) programs have experienced enrollment decline, leading some PETE faculty to consider increasing efforts to recruit new students to their programs. This aspect of the current study sought to investigate PETE program coordinators’ perceptions of possible causes for decreased PETE enrollments as well as their role in, and barriers to, recruiting preservice teachers. Methods: Thirty-six PETE program coordinators (12 males and 24 females) participated in in-depth interviews. The data were coded using a standard interpretative approach grounded in inductive analysis and constant comparison. Results: PETE faculty members perceived declining enrollments to be related to negative public perceptions of education, low-quality K-12 physical education, academically unprepared PETE students, and restructuring programs to emphasize other kinesiology areas. Though compelled to recruit, PETE coordinators questioned their responsibility to do so and reported lacking time and training to be effective. Discussion/Conclusions: PETE coordinators favor recruiting strategies that are less time-intensive and match their academic skill set.

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Ben D. Kern, Suzan F. Ayers, Chad M. Killian and Amelia Mays Woods

Background/Purpose: Student retention in physical education teacher education (PETE) programs is critical to promoting high-quality physical education in schools. This aspect of the current study was to investigate PETE program coordinators’ perceptions of their role in the process of retaining students within their programs. Method: Thirty-six PETE program coordinators (12 males and 24 females) completed in-depth interviews. The data were analyzed using a standard interpretative approach grounded in inductive analysis and constant comparison. Results: The PETE coordinators in this study perceived retention to be: (a) aligned with core job expectations, (b) grounded in relationships, (c) impacted by external and policy factors, and (d) limited by time and resources. Discussion/Conclusion: Retention in PETE is supported when faculty members utilize constructivist learning pedagogies and develop a sense of belonging among PETE students. Retention issues may be addressed through involvement with state policymakers and professional organizations.