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Justin A. Haegele and T. Nicole Kirk

The purpose of this study was to adopt an explicitly intersectional approach to examine the embodied perspectives of males with visual impairments about physical education. An interpretative phenomenological analysis research approach was used, and six adults (18–33 years) who identified as males with visual impairments acted as participants. The primary sources of data were semistructured, audiotaped, telephone interviews and reflective field notes. Thematic development utilized a four-step interpretative phenomenological analysis-guided analytical process. Based on the data analysis, the following three interrelated themes emerged: (a) “I didn’t feel very integrated”: Noninclusionary experiences based on blindness; (b) “Oh great, where’s my cane now?”: Bullying, blindness, and maleness; and (c) “Okay, just do what you can”: Competitive culture glass ceiling. The themes highlight several issues that have been faced by males with visual impairments, which should be considered by physical education and adapted physical education personnel to enhance the quality of education for this population.

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T. Nicole Kirk and Justin A. Haegele

The theory of planned behavior is a psychological framework designed to examine the relationship between beliefs and volitional behaviors such as physical activity engagement. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the published empirical literature on the use of the theory of planned behavior in the context of physical activity beliefs and behaviors of individuals with disabilities. Electronic-database searches were conducted to identify relevant articles published between 1990 and 2018, yielding 11 articles that met all criteria for inclusion. Data such as population, measures, research design, and results were extracted from qualifying studies. Article quality was addressed using modified versions of the National Institutes of Health’s Quality Assessment Tools. In keeping with the theory of planned behavior model, major findings indicate that intention to be physically active has the strongest relationship with physical activity behavior, while the predictive usefulness of belief factors was mixed, among individuals with disabilities.

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Justin A. Haegele, Takahiro Sato, Xihe Zhu and T. Nicole Kirk

The purpose of this study was to examine the reflections of adults with visual impairments regarding paraeducator support during their school-based integrated physical education. An interpretative phenomenological analysis research approach was used, and 9 adults (age 21–34 years; 8 women and 1 man) with visual impairments acted as participants. Semistructured audio-recorded telephone interviews and reflective field notes were sources of data. A 3-step analytic process was adopted for thematic development. Based on the data analysis, 3 interrelated themes emerged: “they wouldn’t let me participate”—restriction in the name of safety, “stuck out like a big tree in a field full of poppies”—unwanted social attention and isolation, and “I felt like they weren’t trained”—paraeducator disengagement and training needs. The themes highlight concerns expressed by the participants, such as the need for paraeducator training, that should be considered when using paraeducator support during physical education.